July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Changes in Corneal Parameters Associated with Scleral Lens Wear
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Muriel Schornack
    Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Samantha Dodda
    Illinois College of Optometry, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Cherie B Nau
    Ophthalmology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Muriel Schornack, None; Samantha Dodda, None; Cherie Nau, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 1787. doi:
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      Muriel Schornack, Samantha Dodda, Cherie B Nau; Changes in Corneal Parameters Associated with Scleral Lens Wear. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):1787.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Theoretical calculations suggest that scleral lens wear may create corneal hypoxic stress that can lead to changes in corneal parameters. In this retrospective study, we compare baseline keratometry values, corneal thickness, and corneal volume to parameters after approximately 6 (5-9) and 12 (10-14) months of scleral lens wear.

Methods : Theoretical calculations suggest that scleral lens wear may create corneal hypoxic stress that can lead to changes in corneal parameters. In this retrospective study, we compare baseline keratometry values, corneal thickness, and corneal volume to parameters after approximately 6 (5-9) and 12 (10-14) months of scleral lens wear.

Results : We identified 16 patients (21 eyes) with baseline and 6-month data. Mean age of these patients was 58 (15) (mean (SD), range 23-80years), and 5 were male. Corneal irregularity was the primary indication for scleral lens wear in 10 eyes, and ocular surface disease was the primary indication for lens wear in the remaining 11 eyes. No differences were noted between any of the corneal parameters studied between baseline and 6 months. We identified 15 patients (21 eyes) with baseline and 12-month data. Mean age of these patients was 58(13) 5 years (range 34-79 years), and 9 were male. Corneal irregularity was the primary indication for scleral lens wear in 17 eyes, and ocular surface disease was the primary indication for lens wear in the remaining 4 eyes. No changes in anterior or posterior corneal curvature were noted. Central pachymetry increased by 2.4% (p=0.03); average pachymetry increased by 2.9% at 2mm (p=0.002), and 3.3% at 4 mm (p=0.01); volume increased by 2.1% at 3 mm (p=0.02) and by2.2% (p=0.01) at 5 mm between baseline and 12 months of scleral lens wear.

Conclusions : Corneal parameters appear to be minimally affected by scleral lens wear after 6 months of wear. Regional pachymetric and volumetric changes were noted between baseline and 12 months, but the percent changes observed are within the range of what is considered normal diurnal variation. This study suggests that scleral lens wear may not cause pathological corneal edema within 6-12 months.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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