July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Transmission of pathogenic bacteria to contact lenses from storage cases
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ajay Kumar Vijay
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Anna Tang
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Rhonda Pham
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jacqueline Tan
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Mark D P Willcox
    School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ajay Kumar Vijay, None; Anna Tang, None; Rhonda Pham, None; Jacqueline Tan, None; Mark Willcox, Ophtechs Corporation (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 1792. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Ajay Kumar Vijay, Anna Tang, Rhonda Pham, Jacqueline Tan, Mark D P Willcox; Transmission of pathogenic bacteria to contact lenses from storage cases. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):1792.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Contact lens storage case contaminants may be transmitted to contact lenses during storage leading to contact lens related microbial adverse events. This study investigated bacterial transmission from biofilms in contact lens storage cases to worn contact lenses during disinfection.

Methods : Pseudomonas aeruginosa 071 or Staphylococcus aureus 031 biofilms were grown on contact lens storage cases. Unworn and worn (8 hours) senofilcon A or etafilcon A contact lenses were placed in the storage cases and the storage cases were disinfected for 4 hours. The number of bacteria in lens storage cases and on lenses was estimated by culture.

Results : After disinfection of the storage cases, significantly fewer viable P. aeruginosa remained compared to untreated storage cases (-2.4 log CFU; p<0.01). However, significantly more P. aeruginosa (1.0 log CFU; p<0.05) remained in the lens storage cases disinfected in the presence of worn contact lenses. Following disinfection, 7% of the P. aeruginosa in biofilms were transferred to contact lenses regardless of lens material. Worn senofilcon A lenses bound significantly more bacteria (1.1 log CFU; p<0.05) than unworn lenses. Disinfection significantly reduced S. aureus numbers in the storage cases (-3.5 log CFU; p<0.01). Worn etafilcon A lenses had significantly less bacteria (-1.4 log CFU; p<0.05) compared to unworn etafilcon A lenses. Following disinfection, only 1% of S. aureus was transferred to either of the worn contact lenses.

Conclusions : Bacteria can be transferred to contact lenses during storage during disinfection. Lens wear affects bacterial transfer to contact lenses.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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