July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Novel sound localization deficit in unilateral amblyopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael D. Richards
    Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Herbert C. Goltz
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Neurosciences and Mental Health, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Agnes MF Wong
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Michael Richards, None; Herbert Goltz, None; Agnes Wong, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 1954. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Michael D. Richards, Herbert C. Goltz, Agnes MF Wong; Novel sound localization deficit in unilateral amblyopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):1954. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Evidence from animals and blind humans suggests that early visual experience influences the calibration of sound localization during development. Despite the link between early visual impairment and altered spatial hearing, sound localization has never been investigated in the most common early-onset visual disorder—amblyopia. Amblyopia affects 3% of the population, and typically presents as unilateral vision loss associated with a history of strabismus and/or anisometropia during a sensitive period of brain development. Hypothesizing that unilateral amblyopia may involve deficits in spatial hearing, we measured the precision and accuracy of sound localization in this clinical population.

Methods : All participants passed a standard hearing test. Experiment 1 measured the minimum audible angle (the smallest reliably perceptible change in sound source position) in 10 adults with amblyopia and 10 controls. Participants listened to a sequence of two clicks from different speakers in an 11-speaker array (subtending the central 30°) and judged whether the second click was located left or right relative to the first. Experiment 2 measured sound localization error in 14 adults with amblyopia and 16 controls. Participants listened to a click train from one of 9 virtual sound sources in the central 32° and aligned a visual cursor to the perceived click location using a mouse.

Results : In Experiment 1, the minimum audible angle (mean ± SEM) was significantly greater in the amblyopia group (3.6 ± 0.4°) compared to controls (2.0 ± 0.1°), t(18) = -4.28, p = .001. In Experiment 2, the overall absolute sound localization error (mean ± SEM) was significantly greater in the amblyopia group (4.7 ± 0.4°) compared to controls (3.5 ± 0.4°), F(1,26) = 4.35, p = .047. The amblyopia group also showed abnormal asymmetry in absolute sound localization error, with greater error in the hemifield ipsilateral to the amblyopic eye (F(1,13) = 5.44, p = .036). Within the amblyopic hemifield, the absolute error correlated positively with deficits in visual acuity (p < .01) and stereo acuity (p < .01).

Conclusions : Sound localization precision and accuracy are impaired in unilateral amblyopia. The asymmetric pattern of sound localization errors suggest that amblyopic vision may interfere with the development of spatial hearing via the retinocollicular pathway.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×