July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Ocular motor abnormalities during saccadic reading in different neuro-ophthalmic diseases
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Angela Oh
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
    School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles , California, United States
  • Tiffany Chen
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
    University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California, United States
  • Ali Shariati
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
  • Naz Jehangir
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
  • Rosa Yu
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
  • Caroline Yu
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
  • Carmel Mercado
    Byers Eye Institute, Palo Alto , California, United States
  • Yaping Joyce Liao
    Ophthalmology , Stanford School of Medicine, Redwood City, California, United States
    Neurology, Stanford School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Angela Oh, None; Tiffany Chen, None; Ali Shariati, None; Naz Jehangir, None; Rosa Yu, None; Caroline Yu, None; Carmel Mercado, None; Yaping Liao, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc. and P30 Core Grant National Eye Institute (P30-EY026877)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 2175. doi:
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      Angela Oh, Tiffany Chen, Ali Shariati, Naz Jehangir, Rosa Yu, Caroline Yu, Carmel Mercado, Yaping Joyce Liao; Ocular motor abnormalities during saccadic reading in different neuro-ophthalmic diseases. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):2175.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Neuro-ophthalmic conditions like stroke, cancer, trauma, and neurodegeneration often lead to vision field loss, eye movement abnormality, or both, resulting in difficulties with common daily visual functions such as saccadic reading. In this study, we investigate reading difficulties in four different groups of neuro-ophthalmic patients using a simple rapid number reading test and infrared oculography for eye movement recording.

Methods : We performed a case control study to assess reading and visual disability at a single institution in controls and patients with different neuro-ophthalmic diseases. Subjects read 120 regularly-spaced single digit numbers to assess basic ocular motor abilities necessary for left-to-right saccadic reading without semantic context. Some underwent 500-Hz binocular 2D infrared oculography (SMI) in order to quantify their saccade and fixation parameters during number reading.

Results : 5 groups of over 200 subjects (126 controls, 18 hemianopia, 12 down-beating nystagmus, 57 Parkinson’s disease, 10 cerebellar ataxia) completed regularly-spaced single digit number reading on a book while their reading time was recorded. Patients with cerebellar ataxia read the slowest, 56% slower than controls (p = 0.001), followed by down-beating nystagmus (35%, p < 0.0001), hemianopia (27%, p = 0.005), and Parkinson’s disease (25%, p < 0.0001). Additional infrared oculography of 70 subjects revealed different patterns of impaired saccadic reading. Patients with hemianopia exhibited striking spatial bias toward their visual field defect. In contrast, patients with eye movement abnormality due to down-beating nystagmus and cerebellar ataxia did not exhibit any spatial bias but made significantly greater number of saccades and fixations (DBN, p = 0.002; ataxia, p < 0.05), with smaller saccade amplitudes (p ≤ 0.01), slower saccade velocities (p < 0.05), and greater fixation dispersion (p < 0.05). Patients with Parkinson’s disease also exhibited no spatial bias and had significantly increased number of saccades and fixations (p < 0.05). However, they had normal saccade amplitudes, velocities, and fixation dispersion.

Conclusions : Single digit number reading test is an easy way to assess reading difficulties in the clinical setting, and eye movement recording reveals a variety of ways that saccadic reading can be slowed in different neurological conditions.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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