July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Tear leukocyte phenotyping in meibomian gland dysfunction by large parameter flow cytometry
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daniel R Saban
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Nancy Reyes
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Rose Mathew
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Chen Yu
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Joan Kalnitsky
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Victor L Perez
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Preeya Gupta
    Ophthalmology, Immunology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Daniel Saban, Allergan, Inc (F); Nancy Reyes, None; Rose Mathew, None; Chen Yu, None; Joan Kalnitsky, None; Victor Perez, Allergan (C); Preeya Gupta, Allergan (C)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Department of Ophthalmology, Duke Eye Center
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3313. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Daniel R Saban, Nancy Reyes, Rose Mathew, Chen Yu, Joan Kalnitsky, Victor L Perez, Preeya Gupta; Tear leukocyte phenotyping in meibomian gland dysfunction by large parameter flow cytometry. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3313.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Chronic blepharitis is an associated risk factor of obstructive MGD. New tools that can immunophenotype the ocular surface in a longitudinal fashion may help better understand the relationship between inflammation and MGD. Here, we leveraged large parameter flow cytometry to examine tear leukocyte content in various MGD patient populations.

Methods : Patients were evaluated and consented at the Duke Eye Center. Severity of MGD was graded and tears were collected on a one-time basis. A total of n=64 subjects were included, which comprised of non-MGD controls (n=14) and MGD subjects (n=50). An n=12 MGD subjects had an underlying immune disease diagnosis (Sjögren’s, atopy, or rosacea), whereas others had MGD only (n=38). After tear collection, cells were resuspended and stained on a per subject basis for CD3, CD4, HLA-DR, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, and viability dye.

Results : Both lymphocytes (CD3+) and myeloid cells (CD3- CD11b+) were identifiable in MGD subject tears. Average leukocyte count in total MGD subject tears was significantly higher (p<0.001) relative to controls. Specifically, average count in immune disease subjects was statistically higher than control (p<0.001), and the same was observed in MGD only (p<0.001). Interestingly, average leukocyte count in immune disease subjects was statistically higher than in MGD only subjects (p<0.001).

Conclusions : Tear leukocyte counts are amplified in MGD patients, which is consistent with the current understanding that obstructive MGD is associated with inflammation. In addition, we were also able to resolve a presence of increased tear leukocytes in subjects with underlying immune disease. Flow cytometry could be a useful tool in MGD research.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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