July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans in an ex vivo model of keratitis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Quan Yan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital (Shanghai First People’s Hospital), Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
    Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Hong Zhu
    Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital (Shanghai First People’s Hospital), Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
  • Xiaodong Sun
    Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai General Hospital (Shanghai First People’s Hospital), Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China
  • Tianhong Dai
    Wellman Center for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Quan Yan, None; Hong Zhu, None; Xiaodong Sun, None; Tianhong Dai, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This study was supported by the National Institute of Health (R21AI109172).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3661. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Quan Yan, Hong Zhu, Xiaodong Sun, Tianhong Dai; Antimicrobial blue light inactivation of Candida albicans in an ex vivo model of keratitis. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3661.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate the efficacy of antimicrobial blue light (aBL) therapy for Candida albicans induced keratitis in an ex vivo model.

Methods : Blue light (405nm) was delivered onto a bioluminescent strain of C. albicans (CEC749) cultured in vitro to investigate blue light's antimicrobial ability. An ex vivo rabbit model of infectious keratitis was established using this strain. Quantitation of fungal luminescence was correlated to colony-forming units (CFU). Blue light was delivered at 24h after fungal inoculation and the luminescence of infected corneas was detected. The efficacy of aBL therapy for infectious keratitis was then evaluated.

Results : Blue light was delivered using a mounted light emitting diode (LED). C. albicans was cultured in YPD broth overnight. 3.59-log10 CFU of fungi were inactivated on average when an exposure of 216 J/cm2 blue light had been delivered in vitro. C. albicans induced keratitis was fully developed in rabbit fresh corneas at 24h after inoculation. Fungal luminescence in the infected corneas was correlated linearly to CFU. Fungal burden in the infected corneas was significantly reduced (1.44-log) after an exposure of 288 J/cm2 blue light.

Conclusions : Antimicrobial blue light therapy can inactivate C. albicans and is a potential treatment for C. albicans-induced keratitis. Further in vivo studies are needed to evaluate corneal and retinal safety when using aBL therapy.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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