July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Effect of Nitric Oxide on Acanthamoeba castellanii
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Choul Yong Park
    Ophthalmology, Dongguk University Hospital, Goyang, Korea (the Democratic People's Republic of)
  • Bora Yim
    Ophthalmology, Dongguk University Hospital, Goyang, Korea (the Democratic People's Republic of)
  • JooHee Park
    Ophthalmology, Dongguk University Hospital, Goyang, Korea (the Democratic People's Republic of)
  • Martha Kim
    Ophthalmology, Dongguk University Hospital, Goyang, Korea (the Democratic People's Republic of)
  • Roy S Chuck
    opthalmology, Albert Einstein college of medicine, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Choul Yong Park, None; Bora Yim, None; JooHee Park, None; Martha Kim, None; Roy Chuck, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education (Grant number: 2016R1D1A1B03931724)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3665. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Choul Yong Park, Bora Yim, JooHee Park, Martha Kim, Roy S Chuck; Effect of Nitric Oxide on Acanthamoeba castellanii. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3665.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Acanthamoeba keratitis is a well-known intractable corneal infectious disease in which the conventional antibiotics are ineffective. In this study, we investigated anti-Acanthamoeba effect of exogenous nitric oxide (NO).

Methods : The most common Acanthameoba that causes keratitis, Acanthameoba castellanii, was axenically cultured and was exposed to various concentrations of NO donors such as sodium nitrite, sodium nitroprusside and NO releasing silica nanoparticles (branched polyethylene imine coated, 100nm sized) for 1 to 7 days (sodium nitrite and sodium nitroprusside: 0, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, and 1000µM; silica nanoparticles: 0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 µg/ml).

Results : Sodium nitrite and sodium nitroprusside showed dose dependent inhibitory effect on A. castellanii viability. More prominent inhibitory effect was observed with sodium nitroprusside (less than 10% of organisms survived with 7 days culture with 1000µM) compared to sodium nitrite. NO releasing silica nanoparticles were successfully internalized into amoebic cytoplasm and accumulated in large vacuoles. While blank silica nanoparticles had no inhibitory effect of A. castellanii viability, NO releasing silica nanoparticles showed dose dependent inhibition of A. castellanii viability. Although, the viability was significantly decreased with NO treatment, no cystic transformation of A. castellanii was observed under phase contrast microscope and transmission electron microscope.

Conclusions : Our results suggest that NO releasing drug platforms including nano-carriers can be a promising therapeutic strategy for Acanthamoeba keratitis.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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