July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Prevalence and Diversity of Antibiotic Resistant Determinants (Genes) in Acanthamoeba Hosts and Contact Lens Associated Microbial Communities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shenandoa Toote
    University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Jorge Maestre-Mesa
    University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Darlene Miller
    University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Shenandoa Toote, None; Jorge Maestre-Mesa, None; Darlene Miller, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3670. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Shenandoa Toote, Jorge Maestre-Mesa, Darlene Miller; Prevalence and Diversity of Antibiotic Resistant Determinants (Genes) in Acanthamoeba Hosts and Contact Lens Associated Microbial Communities. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3670.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Antibiotic resistance is an increasing public health concern among isolates recovered from corneal ulcers. Contact lens wear is a leading risk factor for microbial keratitis. Prevalence of environmental and pathogen specific antibiotic resistant genes and their interaction in contact lens cases or at the ocular surface is unknown. Our purpose was to document the frequency and diversity of antibiotic resistant genes among Acanthamoeba hosts and contact lens case associated microbial communities (CLAMC) recovered from patients with microbial keratitis.

Methods : We utilized whole genome sequencing and metagenomics to survey and document the presence of antibiotic resistant genes among amebic microbiomes (n=4), mixed CLAMC with (ACLAMC, n=4) and without Acanthamoeba species (NACLAMC, n=7).

Results : A total of 172 unique antibiotic resistant determinants (genes) were documented among the 3 groups conveying resistance to 14 individual and multiple drug classes. No significant difference was documented between the average number of antibiotic resistant genes in ACLAMC or NACLAMC contact lens communities (n=38/266, n=39/156, p=0.8386) respectively. Frequency of antibiotic genes among amebic hosts (n=20) with average of 5 was 8X lower than in contact lens cases. No overlap of genes was found in Acanthamoeba hosts versus contact lens communities.

Antibiotic resistant genes to commonly dispensed ocular antimicrobials classes included: aminoglycosides (n=24, 13.9%), beta lactams (n= 33, 19.2%), quinolones/fluoroquinolones (n=2, 1.2%), glycopeptides (n=2, 1.2%), tetracyclines (n=7, 4.1%), macrolides (n=11, 6.4%), sulfonamides (n=4, 2.3%), and polypeptides (n=8, 4.6%). Multidrug resistance genes due to the presence of efflux pumps were harbored by 39.5% of gene determinants.

Resistant determinants were most frequently detected in gram negative organisms (n=14/22, 64% vs n=8/22, 36% for gram positives). P. aeruginosa was associated with 65% of all samples and 81% of all CLAMC. S. aureus was linked to 78% of host samples and 16% of NACLAMC compared to 2% of ACLAMC samples.

Conclusions : Antibiotic resistant genes may be a frequent occurrence among Acanthamoeba hosts and contact lens associated microbial communities. Contact lens cases may serve as a unique niche for recovery, exchange, and dispersal of multidrug resistant genes to the ocular surface and/or environment.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×