July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Prevalence and Risk Factors of Retinal Detachment from Retinopathy of Prematurity
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sila Bal
    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Lauren Tomlinson
    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Yinxi Yu
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Gui-Shuang Ying
    Scheie Eye Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Gil Binenbaum
    Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
    Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Sila Bal, None; Lauren Tomlinson, None; Yinxi Yu, None; Gui-Shuang Ying, Chengdu Kanghong Biotech co. Ltd (C), Ziemer Ophthalmic Systems AG (C); Gil Binenbaum, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH 1R01EY021137-01A1
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3754. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Sila Bal, Lauren Tomlinson, Yinxi Yu, Gui-Shuang Ying, Gil Binenbaum; Prevalence and Risk Factors of Retinal Detachment from Retinopathy of Prematurity. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3754. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Retinal detachment (RD) can develop from retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) despite treatment for Type 1 ROP. We sought to determine the prevalence, timing, and risk factors for RD from ROP.

Methods : Retrospective G-ROP Study at 29 North-American hospitals between 2006-2012. Primary outcomes were prevalence of eyes developing RD (stage 4 or 5) and onset post-treatment. Birth weight (BW), gestational-age, postnatal-weight gain, surgical necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), sepsis, and days of oxygen supplementation were evaluated as risk factors among treated eyes using multivariable regression.

Results : RD developed in 70/14,996 eyes (0.47%, 95% CI 0.37-0.59%) and 46/7,483 infants (0.61%); 37 stage 4, 33 stage 5; 52% had bilateral RD. 6 eyes/3 infants developed RD without Type 1 ROP diagnosis or treatment. 64/885 eyes developed RD following laser (7.2%, 5.8-9.3%): 56/742 Type 1, 8/128 Type 2. RD occurred at median 5.6 weeks (range 0.7-19 weeks) following treatment. 10 (15.6%) RD’s were within 2 weeks of treatment. Number treated within 72 hours of Type 1 diagnoses was similar between RD and non-RD eyes. In multivariable analysis, lower BW (OR 1.03 per-10 gram-decrease (1.01-1.05)) and NEC (OR 3.0, 1.5-5.9) were significant risk factors for RD following treatment. RD rates were, for example, 11.9% for BW<500g without NEC; 16.9% for BW<700g with NEC.

Conclusions : 7.2% of eyes progress to RD despite treatment for ROP. Infants with low BW and/or NEC are at increased risk for RD. Identification of infants at increased risk for RD could lead to modifications of treatment criteria or timing for such infants.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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