July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Macular Pigment and Prevalent Inflammatory Disease Among Older Women in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krista Christensen
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Zhe Liu
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Robert Wallace
    College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Yao Liu
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Amy E Millen
    Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, United States
  • Barbara A Blodi
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Michael L Klein
    Ophthalmology, Casey Eye Institute-OHSU, Portland, Oregon, United States
  • Julie A. Mares
    Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Krista Christensen, None; Zhe Liu, None; Robert Wallace, None; Yao Liu, None; Amy Millen, None; Barbara Blodi, None; Michael Klein, None; Julie Mares, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute grants R01EY013018, R01EY016886, R01EY025292, P30EYO16665,National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute contracts HHSN268201100046C, HHSN268201100001C, HHSN268201100002C, HHSN268201100003C, HHSN268201100004C, and HHSN271201100004C, and an unrestricted departmental grant from the Research to Prevent Blindness, and the UW Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4509. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Krista Christensen, Zhe Liu, Robert Wallace, Yao Liu, Amy E Millen, Barbara A Blodi, Michael L Klein, Julie A. Mares; Macular Pigment and Prevalent Inflammatory Disease Among Older Women in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4509.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Macular pigment (MP) may serve as a marker of general health, and intake of dietary carotenoids with anti-inflammatory properties. We evaluated the association between MP and prevalent inflammatory disease in a longitudinal study of post-menopausal women.

Methods : This analysis includes 316 women (mean age=80.3, standard deviation [SD]=5.1 years) in CAREDS who completed 15-year follow-up visits (April 2016-October 2017) including MP testing and a questionnaire including self-reported physician diagnoses of inflammatory diseases. MP optical density (MPOD) was measured in the best eye at 0.5 degrees (reference of 7 degrees) from the foveal center using heterochromatic flicker photometry. Odds ratios (ORs) for each unit increase in MPOD were estimated for both specific and grouped inflammatory diseases using logistic regression, adjusting for age, smoking, and central adiposity (waist-hip ratio).

Results : Inflammatory disease was reported by 70% of women, with non-rheumatoid arthritis being the most common (63%), followed by rheumatoid arthritis (8%). Since few or no women reported Crohn’s disease/colitis, Sjogren’s syndrome (1.9% for both), celiac disease (0.6%), or lupus (0), these conditions were not evaluated further. Mean MPOD was 0.6 (SD=0.3) units. In adjusted regression models, no significant associations were observed, but the direction indicated lower odds of disease with higher MP, with an odds ratio of 0.6 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.3, 1.2) for any inflammatory disease. Similarly reduced odds ratios were found for rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid arthritis. Sensitivity analyses showed stronger protective associations among women for conditions thought to promote inflammation: lower serum 25 (OH) vitamin D (OR=0.4, 95% CI: 0.1, 1.1); high dietary saturated fat and low dietary fiber intakes (OR=0.3, 95% CI: 0.0, 2.7); and greater central adiposity (OR=0.1, 95% CI: 0.0, 0.5). Trends in associations with MP at baseline and change in MPOD over 15 years were similar.

Conclusions : Although not significant, there was a trend towards decreased odds of any inflammatory disease or arthritis with higher MPOD in older women, particularly in those with other inflammation-related conditions.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×