July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Comparison of a portable digital ophthalmoscope to the conventional direct ophthalmoscope as a teaching tool for medical students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ye Ji Kim
    UCSD, San Diego, California, United States
  • Daniel Chao
    UCSD, San Diego, California, United States
    Allergan, Dublin, Ireland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ye Ji Kim, None; Daniel Chao, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4622. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Ye Ji Kim, Daniel Chao; Comparison of a portable digital ophthalmoscope to the conventional direct ophthalmoscope as a teaching tool for medical students. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4622.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Background: Direct ophthalmoscopy is a difficult skill to master that is traditionally introduced and taught in medical school. Visualizing the fundus using direct ophthalmoscopy is technically challenging, especially through undilated pupils. The D-Eye digital ophthalmoscope is an attachment that converts a smartphone into a fundus camera. This new technology allows the retinal image to be seen on the smartphone screen by third parties both during and after the ophthalmoscopic exam.

Objectives: The purpose of this study is to determine whether the D-Eye Digital Ophthalmoscope is beneficial as a teaching tool for medical students compared to the traditional direct ophthalmoscope.

Methods : Methods: As part of the UCSD School of Medicine second year education, students were taught ophthalmoscopy during a half-day clinical skills session. After an hour of didactic, students were divided into small groups to work directly with ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents to develop their clinical skills using both the traditional direct ophthalmoscope and D-eye digital ophthalmoscope. Following the workshop, participants completed a survey asking them to rate on a scale of 1-5 the ease of use and their own confidence and proficiency using the two ophthalmoscopes.

Results : Results: One hundred and twenty-two medical students participated. The participants significantly preferred the digital ophthalmoscope over the traditional direct ophthalmoscope for learning how to identify the optic disc (78%; P<0.001) as well as for evaluating patients (76%; P<0.001). The students reported a more positive experience with the digital ophthalmoscope, specifically regarding ease of use (4.24 vs 2.75; P<0.001), their confidence in performing ophthalmoscopy (3.73 vs 2.39; P<0.001), their ability to identify vessels (4.30 vs 3.32; P<0.001) and their ability to visualize features of the optic nerve (4.01 vs 2.60; P<0.001).

Conclusions : Conclusion: The digital ophthalmoscope is associated with improved subjective measures of ease of use, confidence, and competence compared to the traditional direct ophthalmoscope for medical students. In learning how to perform ophthalmoscopy, the digital ophthalmoscope was the preferred device, especially for learning how to identify the optic disc.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×