July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
The influence of the soft contact lens wear on higher order aberrations and accommodation in eyes with myopia and hyperopia.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sona Harutyunyan
    Helmholtz Moscow research institute of eye disease, Moscow, Russian Federation
  • Elena Tarutta
    Helmholtz Moscow research institute of eye disease, Moscow, Russian Federation
  • Anush Khandzhyan
    Helmholtz Moscow research institute of eye disease, Moscow, Russian Federation
  • Narine Khodzhabekyan
    Helmholtz Moscow research institute of eye disease, Moscow, Russian Federation
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Sona Harutyunyan, None; Elena Tarutta, None; Anush Khandzhyan, None; Narine Khodzhabekyan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4748. doi:
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      Sona Harutyunyan, Elena Tarutta, Anush Khandzhyan, Narine Khodzhabekyan; The influence of the soft contact lens wear on higher order aberrations and accommodation in eyes with myopia and hyperopia.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4748.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To compare accommodation, pseudoaccomodation (PA) and higher order optical aberrations (HOA) in the myopic and hyperopic eyes of young adults with and without soft contact lenses (SCL).

Methods : We have enrolled 85 subjects (mean age: 14.9±0.6 years) of which 123 eyes were myopic (-5.27±1.4D) and 46 hyperopic (3.53±1.2D). HOAs were recorded and analyzed for the 4 mm pupil diameter of the eyes imaged by the OPD-Scan III (Nidek). Objective accommodative response (OAR) was measured with binocular open-field autorefkeratometer (Grand Seiko WR-5100K). The amplitude of pseudoaccommodation (PA) was determined as the difference between the calculated additional plus lens +3.0D and the power of minimum plus lens wich allowed reading in cycloplegic conditions (1% cyclopentolate hydrochloride x2) at the distance of 33cm. Relative accommodation reserves (RAR) were measured. Student’s t-test was used for statistical analyses.

Results : Vertical coma decreased significantly in myopic eyes wearing SCL as compared to those without SCL (0.001±0.001μm vs. 0.04±0.01μm, (p<0.05), horizontal coma and trefoil increased significantly in SCL wear (-0.01±0.01 vs. 0.01±0.01μm and -0.01±0.01 vs. 0.01±0.005μm p<0.05). Hyperopic eyes with SCL wear showed decrease in the vertical trefoil as compared to those without SCL (-0.06±0.01vs. -0.01±0.01μm (p<0.05)), the vertical and horizontal coma changed to negative values (0.01±0.001 vs. -0.02±0.01μm, 0.001±0.001 vs. -0.03±0.01μm (p<0.05)). Spherical aberrations (SA=S4+S8+S12) in SCL changed to negative values (0.01±0.003 vs. -0.04±0.01μm in myopia, and 0.06±0.002 vs. -0.02±0.001μm in hyperopia (p<0.05). In myopia, OAR, RAR and PA were significantly higher in SCL wear than in glasses. OAR was significantly higher in hyperopic eyes with SCL wear. Also, SCL wear did not influence PA values significantly.

Conclusions : SCL wear can affect HOAs in myopic and hyperopic eyes of young adults and thus improve visual performance. The SCL correction of the ametropia increases the accommodative ability of an eye as compared with the spectacle correction. These effects should be considered in ametropia correction method selection.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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