July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
The Impact of Short-term Play of Visual Reality Games on Ocular Surface, Tear Functions and Dioptric Status in College Students.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Zongyi Zhan
    ZhongShan Ophthalimic Center, Guangzhou, China
  • Yangfan Yang
    ZhongShan Ophthalimic Center, Guangzhou, China
  • Minbin Yu
    ZhongShan Ophthalimic Center, Guangzhou, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Zongyi Zhan, None; Yangfan Yang, None; Minbin Yu, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Science and Technology Planning Project of Guangdong Province (grant No. 2017A020215092), China
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4867. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Zongyi Zhan, Yangfan Yang, Minbin Yu; The Impact of Short-term Play of Visual Reality Games on Ocular Surface, Tear Functions and Dioptric Status in College Students.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4867.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate the effect of short-term play of visual reality (VR) games on the ocular surface, tear functions and dioptric status in college students.

Methods : Prospective observational study. Thirty college students (15 female and 15 male; mean age, 22.30±2.53 years) with emmetropia and ametropia were enrolled in the study. Ocular surface, dioptric status, intraocular pressure (IOP) and tear functions tests including fluorescein vital staining, Schirmer test, tear meniscus height measurement, tear film break-up time (BUT), oculus automatic classification, conjunctiva red-values and ciliary red-values were performed before and after the 2-hours play of VR games.

Results : There were no significantly difference of dioptric status, IOP, ocular surface and tear functions between before and after 2-hours paly of VR games in 60 eyes (P >0.05). In eleven eyes with mild dry-eyes patients without medications, the mean first non-invasive keratography tear break-up time (NITBUTf) was 5.65±1.11s before and 11.64±4.82s after the play of AR games and the mean average non-invasive keratography tear break-up time (NITBUTa) was 4.19±0.69s before and 9.81±5.33s after the play of AR games. The BUT significantly improved after the play of AR games (P <0.000 and P <0.000 of NITBUTf and NITBUTa, respectively). Two subjects felt dizzy and nauseated after the AR games.

Conclusions : Colleges students who had a short-term play of VR games might not have ocular side effects. The BUT seemed to be improved after the play of VR games due to the head-mounted stereoscopic goggles worked as a wet room.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×