July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Age-related eye disease and cognitive function
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie Varin
    School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Ottawa University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Marie-Jeanne Kergoat
    Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Sylvie Belleville
    Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Gisele Li
    Ophthalmology Department, Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Jacqueline Rousseau
    Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Marie-Hélène Roy-Gagnon
    School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Ottawa University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Solmaz Moghadaszadeh
    Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Ellen E Freeman
    School of Epidemiology and Public Health, Ottawa University, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Melanie Varin, None; Marie-Jeanne Kergoat, None; Sylvie Belleville, None; Gisele Li, None; Jacqueline Rousseau, None; Marie-Hélène Roy-Gagnon, None; Solmaz Moghadaszadeh, None; Ellen Freeman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  CIHR Grant MOP 133560
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 5163. doi:
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      Melanie Varin, Marie-Jeanne Kergoat, Sylvie Belleville, Gisele Li, Jacqueline Rousseau, Marie-Hélène Roy-Gagnon, Solmaz Moghadaszadeh, Ellen E Freeman; Age-related eye disease and cognitive function. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):5163.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : There is growing interest in the relationship between age-related vision loss and cognitive function. Our objective was to determine if two groups with age-related eye disease have worse cognitive function than a group with normal vision using cognitive tests that do not rely on vision.

Methods : We are conducting a cross-sectional hospital-based study of older adults (n=236) having either age-related macular degeneration (AMD) (n=65), glaucoma (n=65), or a control group with normal vision (n=106) in Montreal, Canada. Those in the AMD group were diagnosed with late stage AMD in both eyes with a better eye visual acuity of 20/40 or worse. Those in the glaucoma group had primary open-angle glaucoma in both eyes with a visual field mean deviation worse or equal to -4dB in their better eye. Controls had no diagnosis of AMD or glaucoma, a visual acuity better than 20/30 in both eyes and a visual field mean deviation better than -3dB in both eyes. Additional inclusion criteria were age of 65 years or older and a score of 10 or more on the Mini-Mental State Examination Blind Version. Cognition was measured with six cognitive tests administered orally including the Verbal Fluency Test animal and letter versions, the Verbal Digit Span forward and backward versions, and the 18-item story with immediate and delayed recall. Linear regression was used for analyzing data.

Results : Both AMD and glaucoma are associated with worse scores on all 6 cognitive outcomes before adjustment (Verbal Fluency Test animal and letter scores, Verbal Digit Span forward and backward scores, 18-item story immediate and delayed recall scores). However, after adjustment for age, sex, education, diabetes, and cataract, there is 1 statistically significant association. Glaucoma is associated with a lower 18-item immediate recall story score (β=-1.40, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) -2.73, -0.07). There is a borderline statistically significant association between AMD and worse letter verbal fluency (β=-1.81, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) -3.65, 0.03).

Conclusions : There is some evidence that age-related eye disease, as defined using our inclusion criteria, is related to cognitive function. Longitudinal follow-up, as is planned in this study, will inform us as to whether age-related eye disease is associated with greater cognitive changes over time.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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