July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Low versus Standard Latency Digital 3D Monitor Visualization for Ophthalmic Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • William R Freeman
    Ophthalmology, UCSD Jacobs Retina Ctr, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Kevin Chen
    Ophthalmology, UCSD Jacobs Retina Ctr, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Daniel Chao
    Ophthalmology, UCSD Jacobs Retina Ctr, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Henry Ferreyra
    Ophthalmology, UCSD Jacobs Retina Ctr, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Eric Nudleman
    Ophthalmology, UCSD Jacobs Retina Ctr, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Dirk-Uwe G Bartsch
    Ophthalmology, UCSD Jacobs Retina Ctr, UCSD Shiley Eye Institute, La Jolla, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   William Freeman, Alleergan (C), Nanovision (C), Spinnaker (C); Kevin Chen, None; Daniel Chao, None; Henry Ferreyra, None; Eric Nudleman, None; Dirk-Uwe Bartsch, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 5916. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      William R Freeman, Kevin Chen, Daniel Chao, Henry Ferreyra, Eric Nudleman, Dirk-Uwe G Bartsch; Low versus Standard Latency Digital 3D Monitor Visualization for Ophthalmic Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):5916.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : We compared two digitally assisted 3D visualization systems for ophthalmic surgery to traditional optical stereo microscopic surgery. Both anterior segment and vitreoretinal surgeries were studied. The goal was to determine if digitally assisted 3D visualization surgery using the one of two TruVision systems (distributed by Alcon) were equivalent to, superior or inferior to traditional microscopic surgery.

Methods : 8 surgeons evaluated two digital surgical systems that were mounted onto a Leica ophthalmic microscope and compared to traditional ocular surgery. The first digital system consisted of a dual HD video system coupled to a 4K display with a 55-inch OLED screen placed 6 feet from the surgeon. The second system consisted of the same camera head but used a low latency 72 millisecond OLED monitor. Both monitors incorporated a passive stereoscopic display using interlaced lines with alternating circular polarization.

Results : 320 vitrectomy procedures and 80 cataract procedures were performed on the digital system and 140 procedures were performed on the same microscope but using oculars. In no case did any surgeon starting with the digital system require reversion to a traditional ocular system. All surgeons felt that the ability to view and surgically deal with pathology was similar to routine optical microscope surgery. However, the brightness of the image and the ability to enhance the stereopsis were advantages over optical microscopy, as was increased engagement of surgical staff who also wore stereo viewing glasses. Lag time was only perceptible with fast gross movements and became nearly imperceptible with the use of the low latency monitor.

Conclusions : Digitally assisted vitreoretinal surgery seems equivalent to optical surgery in anterior and posterior segment procedures from the perspective of surgical visualization and surgeon preference. Ultra-low latency monitors (under 40 msec) can reduce perceptible latency. The immersive environment of digital surgery allows all ancillary personnel to participate fully and may improve patient care.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×