July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Study of photic phenomena sizes and subjective vision quality while virtually implanting different chromatic correcting intraocular lenses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karsten Sperlich
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Rostock, Rostock, Germany
  • Julia Schubert
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Rostock, Rostock, Germany
  • Mario Gerlach
    Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Berlin, Germany
  • Valentin Fuchs
    Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Berlin, Germany
  • Sebastian Bohn
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Rostock, Rostock, Germany
  • Heinrich Stolz
    Institute of Physics, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany
  • Piotr Marczuk
    Carl Zeiss Meditec AG, Berlin, Germany
  • Rudolf F. Guthoff
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Rostock, Rostock, Germany
  • Oliver Stachs
    Department of Ophthalmology, University Medical Center Rostock, Rostock, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Karsten Sperlich, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (F); Julia Schubert, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (F); Mario Gerlach, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (E); Valentin Fuchs, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (E); Sebastian Bohn, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (F); Heinrich Stolz, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (F); Piotr Marczuk, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (E); Rudolf Guthoff, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (F); Oliver Stachs, Carl Zeiss Meditec AG (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 5967. doi:
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      Karsten Sperlich, Julia Schubert, Mario Gerlach, Valentin Fuchs, Sebastian Bohn, Heinrich Stolz, Piotr Marczuk, Rudolf F. Guthoff, Oliver Stachs; Study of photic phenomena sizes and subjective vision quality while virtually implanting different chromatic correcting intraocular lenses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):5967.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : A polychromatic contrast increase is obtained, using IOLs compensating the chromatic aberrations of the human eye. However, its impact on subjective vision quality or sizes of starburst and halo, undesirable vision phenomena usually associated with multifocal and EDoF lenses, is unknown. The goal of this study was a qualitative and quantitative comparative analysis of night vision quality and photic phenomena while virtually implanting basically the same IOLs with and without chromatic correction.

Methods : The study was conducted using a device named VirtIOL, allowing the subjects a visual experience of a test IOL, mimicking optically the effects of an implanted IOL. A range of monofocal, diffractive multifocal and EDoF IOLs were analyzed, which differ in add power and chromatic correction. The study consists of three parts: (1) qualitative analysis of vision quality, (2) quantitative analysis of the perceived photic phenomena sizes and (3) analysis of optical performance. (1) A display with a night scenery and a white-light LED, integrated in context, as glare source were placed in 6 m distance. 40 subjects had to sort the IOLs according to their best visual experience. (2) The subjects had to adjust the size of a gauging circle to match the perceived halo and starburst size. Consequently, the angular size of the subjective photic phenomena were calculated. (3) A CMOS camera attached to the VirtIOL was used to compare simulated and experimental data and to conduct optical performance tests.

Results : For mesopic distance vision, the monofocal IOL was preferred most. For this lens, starburst and halo size were found to be the smallest. An experimental multifocal lens with added chromatic correction, showing the largest starburst and halo size, was preferred least. However, the best diffractive lens was a chromatic correcting EDoF IOL despite of the second largest starburst pattern. Using monochromatic test images (red, green, blue) and the camera, chromatic correction needs could be determined.

Conclusions : This method helps to understand the relation between night vision phenomena and individual optical designs. Although chromatic aberration corrections tend to induce larger starbursts, the subjective visual quality was best for a chromatic correcting diffractive EDoF IOL. Hence, subjective visual quality does not directly scale with the starburst size.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

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