July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Quality of Vision After Wavefront-Guided or Wavefront-Optimized Photorefractive Keratectomy: A Prospective Randomized Contralateral Eye Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ryan Smith
    Stanford Univeristy , Los Altos, California, United States
  • Edward E Manche
    Stanford Univeristy , Los Altos, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ryan Smith, OmegaD, LLC (I); Edward Manche, Abbott Medical Optics, Inc (C), Allergan, Inc. (C), Avellino Laboratories, Inc (C), Calhoun Vision, Inc (I), Guidepoint Global (C), Seros Medical, LLC (R), Seros Medical, LLC. (I), Veralas (I)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 5977. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Ryan Smith, Edward E Manche; Quality of Vision After Wavefront-Guided or Wavefront-Optimized Photorefractive Keratectomy: A Prospective Randomized Contralateral Eye Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):5977.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To compare self-reported quality of vision (QoV) outcomes after WaveFront Guided (WFG) vs WaveFront Optimized (WFO) Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK) in myopes.

Methods : Consecutive myopic patients were prospectively randomized in this eye-to-eye study to be treated with either WF-guided or WF-optimized PRK with the WaveLight Allegretto Eye-Q 400-Hz excimer laser (Alcon, Inc), with the fellow eye receiving the alternate laser treatment. Patients completed the validated, Rasch-tested, linear-scaled 30-item QoV questionnaire assessing the quality of vision and visual symptoms (daytime and nighttime glare, daytime and nighttime clarity, halos, haze, fluctuating vision, and double vision) preoperatively and at months 1, 3, 6, and 12.

Results : The study enrolled 34 eyes in 17 myopic patients. None of the measured QoV parameters exhibited statistically significant differences between the groups preoperatively or at 1 year postoperative follow up (all p>0.05). However, amongst the WF-guided subset, there was a statistically significant improvement at 1 year postoperatively compared to pretreatment symptoms in severity and bothersomeness of subjective glare (p=0.04, p=0.02 respectively), bothersomeness of haloes (p=0.03), bothersomeness of blurred vision (p=0.049), frequency and bothersomeness of focusing difficulties (p=0.03, p=0.01, respectively), and frequency, severity, and bothersomeness of difficulty judging distance or depth (p=0.01, p=0.03, p=0.05, respectively). The WF-optimized subset saw a statistically significant improvement at 1-year postoperatively compared to pretreatment symptoms in subjective glare bothersomeness (p=0.04), haloes bothersomeness (p=0.03), and focusing difficulties bothersomeness (p=0.01).

Conclusions : Twelve months after surgery, the self-reported visual symptoms from the most patients were similar in eyes receiving WF-guided or WF-optimized PRK. There were no statistically significant differences noted between treatment groups in self-reported QoV assessed by the QoV questionnaire. In general, 12.5% of patients preferred WF-guided PRK, 31.25% preferred WF-optimized PRK, and 56.25% had no preference at 12 months. Subgroup analysis also showed statistically significant improvement in multiple subjective visual symptoms in both the WF-guided preoperative vs. 1-year group and WF-optimized preoperative vs. 1-year treatment group.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×