July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Primary care physicians' recall of diagnostic and treatment qualities of glaucoma: effect of an educational program
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kirsten Midgley
    Georgetown University/Washington Hospital Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Michael Summerfield
    Georgetown University/Washington Hospital Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
    Washington Eye Institute, Riverdale, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kirsten Midgley, None; Michael Summerfield, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 6157. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Kirsten Midgley, Michael Summerfield; Primary care physicians' recall of diagnostic and treatment qualities of glaucoma: effect of an educational program. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):6157.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Early intervention in glaucoma has been found to be clinically beneficial and cost effective. Primary care physicians are imperative for participating in continuity of care, identifying at-risk patients, and monitoring adverse effects of those patients being treated, thereby encouraging adherence to medical treatment. A recent study (Rothshtein et al. 2015) showed a significant gap between primary care physicians' level of agreement with their roles in glaucoma disease managment and the frequency of reported performance. Study participants relayed that glaucoma-related knowledge gaps, especially in relation to treatment’s adverse effects, are major barriers to their performance in glaucoma care. Few studies have attempted improvement in primary-care focused glaucoma principles. The purpose of this study is to educate internists about symptoms, diagnosis and treatment for screening at-risk and optimizing currently affected glaucoma patients, and then to measure outcomes of an educational program by pre and post-intervention exam results.

Methods : A 30 minute slide-narration educational program, which covered differences between angle closure and open angle glaucoma, diagnostic criteria, risk factors, treatments, and local and systemic side effects of glaucoma medications, was lectured. 15 internal medicine residents and 2 primary-care focused internists were given a seven question multiple-choice exam before and after the intervention. These individually distinct tests focused on signs/symptoms, diagnosis, risk factors, treatments, and local and systemic medication side effects.

Results : Following the intervention, residents and staff showed improved accuracy on the quizzes (-0.23 to -0.05, p=0.004).

Conclusions : A brief and applicable educational intervention can result in meaningful improvement in primary care physician knowledge of a common and vision-threatening disease. These encouraging results will be adapted to formulate additional lectures on other primary-care pertinent ophthalmic topics.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×