July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Development of iFixPen™ – using 3D printing to treat corneal ulcers
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerard Sutton
    Lions NSW Eye Bank, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Save Sight Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jingjing You
    Save Sight Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Simon Cooper
    Lions NSW Eye Bank, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Hannah Frazer
    Save Sight Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Chris Hodge
    Lions NSW Eye Bank, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Vision Eye Institute, Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia
  • Xiao Liu
    Intelligent Polymer Research institute/AIIM, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Adam Taylor
    Intelligent Polymer Research institute/AIIM, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Erin McColl
    Intelligent Polymer Research institute/AIIM, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Gordon Wallace
    Intelligent Polymer Research institute/AIIM, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Gerard Sutton, University of Sydney (P); Jingjing You, University of Sydney (P); Simon Cooper, Australian Corneal Bioengineering Centre (P); Hannah Frazer, University of Sydney (P); Chris Hodge, None; Xiao Liu, None; Adam Taylor, None; Erin McColl, None; Gordon Wallace, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Sydney Eye Hospital Foundation; Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4343. doi:
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      Gerard Sutton, Jingjing You, Simon Cooper, Hannah Frazer, Chris Hodge, Xiao Liu, Adam Taylor, Erin McColl, Gordon Wallace; Development of iFixPen™ – using 3D printing to treat corneal ulcers. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4343.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Corneal ulceration resulting from infection, injury or surgery represents a leading cause of monocular visual loss worldwide. Current treatment options remain limited and do not actively promote recovery and may lead to scarring in significant cases. We describe the development of a novel treatment option for corneal ulcers utilizing biomaterials and 3D printing techniques.

Methods : The system is comprised of two components; BioInk and the structure. The iFixPen™ was designed for delivery of the BioInk to cornea. We tested the iFixPen™ on 10 ex vivo pig corneas to measure wound seal following manual corneal perforation (n=5), and to optimize the BioInk delivery in ulceration (n=5) (Figure 1).

Results : The BioInk has two components; a biologically active component and secondary gelatination reagent. The handheld iFixPen™ was designed to accommodate the separate components prior to the mixing chamber and tip delivering the BioInk to the surface (Figure 2). Both mechanical and in vivo tests confirmed ink printability and appeared to encourage wound healing (additional abstract). Our ex vivo test showed complete sealing of perforation within 5 minutes for each sample cornea.

Conclusions : We have developed a potential novel combination for treatment of corneal ulceration and injury. Our preliminary results have confirmed printing compatibility and the BioInk can encourage faster epithelial cell healing. Animal trials are planned for early 2018.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 


Figure 1: Perforation experiment. A full thickness hole is created. The BioInk is placed over the hole using the iFixPen™ and left for 3 min. Wound integrity was confirmed with additional pressure, and air-bubbles can be observed within.


Figure 1: Perforation experiment. A full thickness hole is created. The BioInk is placed over the hole using the iFixPen™ and left for 3 min. Wound integrity was confirmed with additional pressure, and air-bubbles can be observed within.

 

The interior design of the iFixPen™ which consisted two syringe each with one of the components of BioInk. A mixing chamber at the end attached to a small motor to extrude the Ink.

The interior design of the iFixPen™ which consisted two syringe each with one of the components of BioInk. A mixing chamber at the end attached to a small motor to extrude the Ink.

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