July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
The Role of Midperipheral Retinal Non-perfusion in Diabetic Macular Edema.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amro Omari
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Lydia Su
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Christopher Sesi
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Katherine Jolitkov
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Rajesh C Rao
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Anjali Shah
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Thiran Jayaundera
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Thomas Gardner
    Kellogg Eye Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Amro Omari, None; Lydia Su, None; Christopher Sesi, None; Katherine Jolitkov, None; Rajesh Rao, None; Anjali Shah, None; Thiran Jayaundera, None; Thomas Gardner, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4854. doi:
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      Amro Omari, Lydia Su, Christopher Sesi, Katherine Jolitkov, Rajesh C Rao, Anjali Shah, Thiran Jayaundera, Thomas Gardner; The Role of Midperipheral Retinal Non-perfusion in Diabetic Macular Edema.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4854.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Current approaches to understanding diabetic macular edema (DME) have focused on the macula, so the role of the mid-peripheral retina is an important knowledge gap. The hypothesis of this study is that eyes with greater midperipheral retinal nonperfusion have a worse outcome than those with mild nonperfusion.

Methods : 23 DME patients and 21 age-matched controls underwent a series of functional vision tests (visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, visual fields) and 200-degree ultra-wide field fluorescein angiography. DME patients were split into those with mild non-perfusion (<25%) and extensive non-perfusion (>50%) based on areas of hypofluorescence on the fluorescein angiogram. Statistical analyses were computed using an analysis of variance (ANOVA) for each functional test between study groups.

Results : The extensive non-perfusion group had worse visual acuity, frequency doubling perimetry, microperimetry, contrast sensitivity, and Octopus static and kinetic performance than the mild non-perfusion group and healthy controls (table 1).

Conclusions : The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the severity of midperipheral non-perfusion is associated with worse visual function in eyes with DME. A better understanding of the role of the mid-periphery in the pathogenesis of DME may improve visual outcomes and lead to more patient specific therapies.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

A comparison of visual function testing results between healthy controls, DME subjects with mild non-perfusion, and those with extensive non-perfusion. The table shows average percent reduction for each parameter relative to the control group. All results were statistically significant at a p <0.05.

A comparison of visual function testing results between healthy controls, DME subjects with mild non-perfusion, and those with extensive non-perfusion. The table shows average percent reduction for each parameter relative to the control group. All results were statistically significant at a p <0.05.

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