July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Head Mounted Display Technology for Low Vision due to Peripheral Field Loss
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yooree Chung
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Andrew Chen
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Shirin E Hassan
    School of Optometry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, United States
  • Manuel Soto Santiago
    Robotics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Lauro Ojeda
    Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • David C Musch
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Donna Wicker
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Sherry Day
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Ashley Howson
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • James D. Weiland
    Biomedical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Sayoko Eileen Moroi
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Joshua R Ehrlich
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Yooree Chung, None; Andrew Chen, None; Shirin Hassan, None; Manuel Santiago, None; Lauro Ojeda, None; David Musch, None; Donna Wicker, None; Sherry Day, None; Ashley Howson, None; James Weiland, None; Sayoko Moroi, None; Joshua Ehrlich, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH UL1TR000433; NIH K23EY027848
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 640. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Yooree Chung, Andrew Chen, Shirin E Hassan, Manuel Soto Santiago, Lauro Ojeda, David C Musch, Donna Wicker, Sherry Day, Ashley Howson, James D. Weiland, Sayoko Eileen Moroi, Joshua R Ehrlich; Head Mounted Display Technology for Low Vision due to Peripheral Field Loss. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):640.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Head-mounted display (HMD) technology may assist patients with peripheral field loss (PFL) by expanding their perceived visual field (VF). In a pilot clinical trial, we sought to determine the effect of a commercially available HMD on the vision and mobility of patients with PFL.

Methods : Participants had Usher syndrome, a III4e Goldmann VF with maximum horizontal extent ≤20°, and no other medical conditions affecting mobility. Prior to using Epson Moverio HMD and after a period of adaptation to the device, participants underwent the following tests: ETDRS visual acuity (VA); Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity (CS); Goldmann VF; visual functioning questionnaires; and gait and mobility testing with and without obstacles. Gait parameters were recorded using inertial measurement units. The VF area was calculated using Adobe Photoshop. Percent preferred walking speed (PPWS) was calculated as the ratio of walking speed with and without obstacles. Data were analyzed using 2-tailed non-parametric tests and the Fisher exact test; we adjusted for inter-eye correlation.

Results : Five participants, 60% female with a median age of 37 years participated in the study. The median VA in the better-seeing eye was 0.30 logMAR without HMD and 0.24 with HMD (p>0.10), while median binocular CS was 1.65 logMAR with and without HMD. The mean and median III4e VF areas without HMD were 445.4 mm2 and 553.4 mm2 and with HMD were 1162.7 mm2 and 1075.6 mm2, respectively (Figure 1); this mean increase of 717.3 mm2 was statistically significant (95%CI 170.0-1264.6; p=0.01). Scores on visual functioning questionnaires did not change during the study (p>0.10). Walking speed (p>0.10), PPWS (p>0.10), lateral and longitudinal stride variability (p>0.10; Figure 2), and the number of obstacle contacts (p=0.82) were unchanged when participants wore HMD.

Conclusions : Commercially available HMD can substantially increase the perceived VF of patients with severe PFL, though mobility performance was not affected. Future work should be done to customize HMD to the needs of patients with PFL and to study further its impact on activities of daily living, including mobility.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Figure 1. The black and red III4e isopters represent one participant’s VF without (area, 250.0 mm2) and with (1070.9 mm2) HMD, respectively.

Figure 1. The black and red III4e isopters represent one participant’s VF without (area, 250.0 mm2) and with (1070.9 mm2) HMD, respectively.

 

Figure 2. The blue and red ellipses represent one participant’s stride variability without and with HMD, respectively.

Figure 2. The blue and red ellipses represent one participant’s stride variability without and with HMD, respectively.

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