July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Phase-Decorrelation OCT for Noncontact Measurement of Biomechanical Effects of Corneal Crosslinking
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brecken Blackburn
    Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Shi Gu
    Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Matthew R Ford
    Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Vinicius Silbiger De Stefano
    Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Michael Jenkins
    Pediatrics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
    Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • William J Dupps
    Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
    Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Andrew Rollins
    Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Heights, Ohio, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Brecken Blackburn, Case Western Reserve University (P); Shi Gu, Case Western Reserve University (P); Matthew Ford, None; Vinicius De Stefano, None; Michael Jenkins, Case Western Reserve University (P); William Dupps, Avedro Inc. (C), Case Western Reserve University (P), Optoquest (P); Andrew Rollins, Case Western Reserve University (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH R01HL083048, R01HL126747, T32EB007509, T32EY007157, C06RR12463, R01EY023381, an Unrestricted Grant Award from Research to Prevent Blindness to the Department of Ophthalmology, Cole Eye Institute (RPB1508DM), Foundation Fighting Blindness Center Grant to the Cole Eye Institute (CCMM08120584CCF), NEI/NIH P30 Core Center Grant (IP30EY025585)
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 745. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Brecken Blackburn, Shi Gu, Matthew R Ford, Vinicius Silbiger De Stefano, Michael Jenkins, William J Dupps, Andrew Rollins; Phase-Decorrelation OCT for Noncontact Measurement of Biomechanical Effects of Corneal Crosslinking. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):745. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : With mounting evidence that common corneal ectasias are causally linked to biomechanical abnormalities, there is a clear need for noninvasive methods of measuring corneal biomechanical properties. Existing methods of biomechanical assesment have various drawbacks: dependence on intraocular pressure (IOP), long acquisition time, limited resolution, and expensive equipment. Here, we present a method which may avoid these limitations by using existing optical coherence tomography systems to detect the endogenous random motility within the cornea which can be associated with degree of stromal crosslinking.

Methods : The principle of phase-decorrelation optical coherence tomography (PhD-OCT) is based on dynamic light scattering measurement of Brownian motion. The direct result of these measurements is a decorrelation coefficient, which yields an “apparent diffusion coefficient”, D. In the cornea, D represents the degree of confinement of collagen within the stroma. A series of ex vivo corneal crosslinking (CXL) experiments was conducted by applying the Dresden protocol to porcine whole globes. Further benchtop experiments determined the effects of external factors, such as IOP, on PhD-OCT. In addition, human patients were imaged with PhD-OCT using a clinical OCT system.

Results : In both the ex vivo porcine cornea and the in vivo human cornea, crosslinking results in the anterior third of the corneal stroma becoming more confined, indicating more crosslinks. This effect was highly repeatable in ex vivo porcine corneas (change in average D = -41.55±9.64%, n=5) and not seen after sham treatments (change in average D = 2.83±12.56%, n=5). (Fig 1) In patients, a similar effect was observed in post-CXL corneas and not observed in untreated corneas. (Fig 2) No dependence of PhD-OCT on IOP was found, while correctable effects were found to be caused by variations of SNR, hydration, incidence angle, as well as axial and lateral motion.

Conclusions : PhD-OCT may be a useful and readily translatable tool for investigating biomechanical properties of the cornea and for enhancing the diagnosis and treatment of patients.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Demonstration of apparent diffusion coefficient (µm2/s) decrease after CXL in ex vivo porcine eyes. Images 5mm lateral, 2mm axial. (D) Mean D of anterior third.

Demonstration of apparent diffusion coefficient (µm2/s) decrease after CXL in ex vivo porcine eyes. Images 5mm lateral, 2mm axial. (D) Mean D of anterior third.

 

Demonstration of apparent diffusion coefficient (µm2/s) decrease in patients with and without CXL treatment. Images 7mm lateral, 2mm axial.

Demonstration of apparent diffusion coefficient (µm2/s) decrease in patients with and without CXL treatment. Images 7mm lateral, 2mm axial.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×