July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Association Between Task Performance and Structure-Function in Glaucoma
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather Livengood
    NYU Langone Eye Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Gadi Wollstein
    NYU Langone Eye Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Hiroshi Ishikawa
    NYU Langone Eye Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Mengfei Wu
    NYU Langone Eye Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
    Division of Biostatistics, Departments of Population Health and Environmental Medicine, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Joel S Schuman
    NYU Langone Eye Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Heather Livengood, None; Gadi Wollstein, None; Hiroshi Ishikawa, None; Mengfei Wu, None; Joel Schuman, Zeiss (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH Grant R01-EY013178, University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Research Development Fund
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3412. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Heather Livengood, Gadi Wollstein, Hiroshi Ishikawa, Mengfei Wu, Joel S Schuman; Association Between Task Performance and Structure-Function in Glaucoma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3412. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Glaucoma affects task performance, a measure of ability in the context of performing daily tasks. Task factors affected by glaucoma are not well characterized for practical ophthalmic application. This study identifies domains of task performance associated with structure-function measures in order to characterize task factors relevant in the context of glaucoma.

Methods : We recruited adults aged 50 years and older with glaucoma, with no other ocular comorbidities, who underwent ophthalmic evaluation. Eleven domains of task performance were analyzed (Table) using the standardized Assessment of Life Habits questionnaire to measure 1) ability to perform tasks (accomplishment, scale 0-10) and 2) satisfaction with task performance (satisfaction, scale 1-5). Better eye visual field mean deviation (MD) and OCT retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell inner plexiform layer (GCIPL) average thickness were analyzed. Multivariable regression analyses determined the association between task performance and MD, RNFL, and GCIPL, adjusting for age, race, glaucoma and depressive symptoms. Depressive symptoms were in the models due to their known association with vision loss.

Results : 77 subjects of average age 68 ± 9.2 years and baseline MD of -3.7 ± 6.3 dB, RNFL of 76.1 ± 13.3 μm and GCIPL of 69.8 ± 10.7 μm were enrolled. Overall task performance scores were high (accomplishment 9.3 ± 0.6, satisfaction 4.5 ± 0.5). For accomplishment, MD, RNFL, and GCIPL were significant indicators for overall task performance scores (p < 0.001) and for ≥6 domains (p ≤ 0.028, Table). For satisfaction, RNFL was a significant indicator for overall task performance scores (p = 0.037). Unlike accomplishment, satisfaction was less associated with structure-function (3 domains across measures). Depressive symptoms were significantly associated with task performance (p ≤ 0.05) in all domains except communication.

Conclusions : Task performance affected by glaucoma is underrecognized in ophthalmic practice. Awareness of task performance accomplishment (ability) may be relevant in glaucoma more so than patients’ satisfaction. Satisfaction is a measure of patients’ perception and their reports often overestimate actual ability. Therefore, measuring accomplishment and its association with structure-function measures may guide future evaluation of those tasks most affected by glaucoma in order to enable timely treatment for task performance limitations.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×