July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
The development of the iFixInkTM system to treat corneal injuries
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hannah Elizabeth Frazer
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Jingjing You
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Simon Cooper
    NSW Statewide Biobank, NSW Health Pathology, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Chris Hodge
    Lions NSW Eye Bank, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Vision Eye Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Xiao Liu
    Intelligent Polymer Research Institute/AIIM Faculty, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Zhi Chen
    Intelligent Polymer Research Institute/AIIM Faculty, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Adam Taylor
    Intelligent Polymer Research Institute/AIIM Faculty, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Erin McColl
    Intelligent Polymer Research Institute/AIIM Faculty, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Gordon Wallace
    Intelligent Polymer Research Institute/AIIM Faculty, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia
  • Gerard Sutton
    Save Sight Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Lions NSW Eye Bank, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Hannah Frazer, University of Sydney (P); Jingjing You, University of Sydney (P); Simon Cooper, Australian Corneal Bioengineering Centre (P); Chris Hodge, None; Xiao Liu, None; Zhi Chen, None; Adam Taylor, None; Erin McColl, None; Gordon Wallace, None; Gerard Sutton, University of Sydney (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Sydney Eye Hospital Foundation; Sydney 2017 Big Idea Grant, Sydney Research
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4344. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Hannah Elizabeth Frazer, Jingjing You, Simon Cooper, Chris Hodge, Xiao Liu, Zhi Chen, Adam Taylor, Erin McColl, Gordon Wallace, Gerard Sutton; The development of the iFixInkTM system to treat corneal injuries. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4344.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Human platelet lysate (hPL) has been shown to encourage proliferation and migration in immortalised corneal epithelial cells (HCE-T). We aimed to develop a novel, xenogeneic-free BioInk (iFixInkTM) that is transparent, biocompatible, biodegradable and bioprintable, utilising the therapeutic benefits of hPL in a 3-dimensional matrix that mimics the native cornea.

Methods : IncuCyte® live cell analysis was used to measure proliferation of P23 HCE-T cells in iFixInkTM seeded in a 96 well plate (n=6) over 7 days. A rheometer was used to measure the storage (G’) and loss (G”) moduli over a time-sweep oscillation of 1Hz. Viscosity across a shear rate ramp between 0.1s-1 and 100s-1 after a 2-minute setting time was also quantified. Mean transmittance of light was measured across the visible spectrum. Pig corneas were perforated with a needle (diameter = 1mm) and sealed with iFixInkTM. Gelation time and line resolution printing were also tested.

Results : HCE-T cells were able to reach confluence over a period of 7 days (92.96±1.07%) (Fig 1). G’ (10.28±0.02Pa) was significantly higher than G” (0.56±0.01Pa) across the time-sweep oscillation suggesting extrusion bioprinting compatibility (Fig 2A) and this gelation process is temperature independent. Mean viscosity was decreased in a non-Newtonian trend across an increasing shear-rate demonstrating shear-thinning properties and further bioprinting compatibility (Fig 2B). Mean transmittance exceeded 97% through the visible spectrum demonstrating transparency (Fig 2C,2D). iFixInkTM was able to successfully create a water-tight seal. Gelation time was under 5 minutes and printing resolution compatible for use in corneal-sized injuries.

Conclusions : We have successfully created a novel BioInk that is biocompatible, biodegradable, transparent and bioprinteable via extrusion that has the potential to treat corneal injuries such as abrasions and ulceration.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Figure 1. Mean confluence as a percentage over 7 days for HCE-T cells grown in the iFixInkTM ± SEM (n=6)

Figure 1. Mean confluence as a percentage over 7 days for HCE-T cells grown in the iFixInkTM ± SEM (n=6)

 

Figure 2. Mechanical properties of the iFixInkTM (n=3) after 2-minute setting time ± SEM A. G’ and G” moduli in Pascals over a time-sweep oscillation of 1Hz B. Mean viscosity in Pascal seconds over a shear rate between 0.1s-1 and 100s-1 C. Mean transmittance of wavelengths in the visible spectrum through a 2mm thickness of the iFixInkTM (%). D. Example of iFixInkTM

Figure 2. Mechanical properties of the iFixInkTM (n=3) after 2-minute setting time ± SEM A. G’ and G” moduli in Pascals over a time-sweep oscillation of 1Hz B. Mean viscosity in Pascal seconds over a shear rate between 0.1s-1 and 100s-1 C. Mean transmittance of wavelengths in the visible spectrum through a 2mm thickness of the iFixInkTM (%). D. Example of iFixInkTM

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