July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Self-Adhering Magnetic Device to Treat Corneal Exposure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Safwan Tayeb
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Raman Michael
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Pete Setabutr
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Charles Qian Yu
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Mark Rosenblatt
    Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences , University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Safwan Tayeb, None; Raman Michael, None; Pete Setabutr, None; Charles Yu, None; Mark Rosenblatt, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This project was supported by unrestricted funding from Research to Prevent Blindness.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 98. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Safwan Tayeb, Raman Michael, Pete Setabutr, Charles Qian Yu, Mark Rosenblatt; Self-Adhering Magnetic Device to Treat Corneal Exposure. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):98.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Incomplete eye closure, lagophthalmos, can be difficult to treat and manage. Left untreated, lagophthalmos may result in exposure keratopathy, vision loss, and potentially blindness. Current therapies including suture tarsorrhaphy, taping, or gold weight implantation have significant cosmetic or functional deficiencies. We hypothesize that magnetic devices can be used to treat lagophthalmos and corneal exposure by controlling eyelid position.

Methods : Our group Barmettler et al (2014) demonstrated the preliminary success of externally affixed magnets in closing the eyelids of healthy volunteers. In this investigation, we improved our externally affixed magnetic tarsorrhaphy device, thus allowing for enhanced comfort, fit, and apposition of magnets during eyelid closure. Design parameters were imputed to CAD software (SolidWorks) and a device mold was 3D printed (Object 30 Prime Plus). The mold was then used to fabricate a prototype device using medical grade PDMS silicone, to be affixed to the eyelids using medical grade adhesive. For rapid assessment of prototypes, we are constructing a 3D model eye which recapitulates the geometries and forces involved in eyelid closure. The device was tested in 5 healthy control subjects. Multiple eye and eyelid measurements were taken immediately before placement of the device, and 5 and 60 minutes after placement. Subjects then rated the ease of application, comfort, and aesthetics on a 10-point scale.

Results : The application of our magnetic tarsorrhaphy device was effective in achieving and maintaining eyelids closure in all of the healthy control subjects with no reported adverse events or side effects.

Conclusions : Lagophthalmos is a devastating condition with currently unsatisfactory treatment options. Our lab has improved upon a novel solution to this problem involving magnetics. We have produced a biocompatible externally affixed device, embedded with magnets, that we hope will provide patients with the ability to close their eyelids and protect their eyes and vision. With no reported safety issues in these control studies, we aim to progress to larger sample size patient testing. Ultimately, We hope to introduce this device as one of the treatment options of lagophthalmos.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Magnetic tarsorrhaphy devices exhibiting magnetic adhesion.

Magnetic tarsorrhaphy devices exhibiting magnetic adhesion.

 

3D printed magnetic force testing apparatus.

3D printed magnetic force testing apparatus.

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