July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Optical coherence tomography angiography reproducibility quantification – segmentation of superficial, deep and choroidal plexus
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rita Laiginhas
    Ophthalmology, Centro Hospitalar de Entre o Douro e Vouga, Santa Maria da Feira, Portugal
    PDICSS, Faculty of Medicine of Porto University, Porto, Portugal
  • João Chibante Pedro
    Ophthalmology, Centro Hospitalar de Entre o Douro e Vouga, Santa Maria da Feira, Portugal
  • Manuel Falcao
    Ophthalmology, Hospital de São João, Porto, Portugal
    Department of Surgery and Physiology,, Faculty of Medicine of Porto University, Porto, Portugal
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Rita Laiginhas, None; João Chibante Pedro, None; Manuel Falcao, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 2867. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Rita Laiginhas, João Chibante Pedro, Manuel Falcao; Optical coherence tomography angiography reproducibility quantification – segmentation of superficial, deep and choroidal plexus. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):2867.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is a novel noninvasive imaging modality for detailed retinal vasculature evaluation. The reproducibility of vasculature image acquisitions is valuable for the follow-up of retinal disorders. We performed a prospective, observational clinical study to investigate the quantitative and qualitative reproducibility of OCTA image acquisitions of superficial (SVP), deep (DVP) and choroidal (CP) vascular plexus.

Methods : Six eyes from four healthy young patients (25-35 years-old) were imaged four times using OCTA (Spectralis, Heidelberg Engineering). All scans followed the same acquisition protocol (10x10, ART5 frames, 512 sections, 6μm) and were prospectively collected using the follow-up software from Heidelberg. The time elapsed between each scan was a few seconds. Standardized images from SVP, DVP and CP were extracted using projection artifact removal option. Quantitative analysis included vascular density (VD) and fractal dimensions (FD). VD was estimated by calculating the black to total pixels ratio in binary images (ImageJ). For FD images were skeletonized and fractal box-counting analyses were conducted using Fractalyse (ThéMA). Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) (SPSS 22) was used to evaluate reliability of ratios and FD. Qualitative analysis was performed by creating overlapped colored layers (one color per image acquisition).

Results : The overall ICC for VD was 0.91 (CI95%0.80-0.96). VD ICC was 0.97 (CI95%0.91-0.99) for SVP, 0.79 (CI95%0.22-0.97) for DVP and 0.86 (CI95%0.49-0.98) for CP. Overall ICC for FD was 0.96 (CI95%0.90-0.99). FD ICC was 0.89 (CI95%0.64-0.98) for SVP and 0.81 (CI95%0.33-0.97) for DVP. Qualitative analysis showed overall overlapping of vascular structures between scans. However, there are small differences between the acquired scans that can be identified.

Conclusions : OCTA is a reliable technique for the follow-up of retinal vessels diseases in SVP. However, reliability decreases for DVP and CP where few small vessels may not be correctly identified in all scans. Small changes in vasculature must be identified with caution as they may be the result of acquisition artifacts. VD and FD were not significantly different for vascular changes monitoring.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Table 1. Quantitative analysis (n=18 scans)

Table 1. Quantitative analysis (n=18 scans)

 

Image1. Qualitative analysis: overlapped layers for SVP, DVP and CP, respectively (n=18 scans)

Image1. Qualitative analysis: overlapped layers for SVP, DVP and CP, respectively (n=18 scans)

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