July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Association of Vision Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Among Midlife Women: Study of Woman’s Health Across the Nation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Navasuja Kumar
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Carrie Karvonen-Gutierrez
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • David Musch
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Sioban Harlow
    Department of Epidemiology, School of Public health, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Sayoko Moroi
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Navasuja Kumar, None; Carrie Karvonen-Gutierrez, None; David Musch, Glaukos, Inc (R), Innfocus, Inc (R), Invantis, Inc (R); Sioban Harlow, None; Sayoko Moroi, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  MCubed, University of Michigan of Office of Research (NK, CK-G, SH, SM). The Study of Women's Health Across the Nation (SWAN) has grant support from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), DHHS, through the National Institute on Aging (NIA), the National Institute of Nursing Research (NINR) and the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health (ORWH) (Grants U01NR004061; U01AG012505, U01AG012535, U01AG012531, U01AG012539, U01AG012546, U01AG012553, U01AG012554, U01AG012495). The content of this abstract is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIA, NINR, ORWH or the NIH. MCUBED
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 4097. doi:
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      Navasuja Kumar, Carrie Karvonen-Gutierrez, David Musch, Sioban Harlow, Sayoko Moroi; Association of Vision Impairment and Depressive Symptoms Among Midlife Women: Study of Woman’s Health Across the Nation. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):4097.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Little is known about the impact of vision impairment (VI) on depressive symptoms among midlife (40-65 years) adults, despite a high prevalence of depression among this age group and presence of many common eye diseases that can compromise vision. We conducted cross-sectional observational studies at two time points during the midlife years, to assess the contribution of VI to depressive symptoms.

Methods : The data for this study were derived from the Study of Woman’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multiethnic population-based study. Visual acuities (distance and near) were measured using the Titmus vision screener. Assessment of depressive symptoms was based on the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CESD) questionnaire. A score of ≥ 16 was considered to be indicative of depressive symptoms. Distance VI was defined as distance visual acuity 20/40 or worse. The same cut point was used to define near VI. The effect of VI on depressive symptoms was analyzed using logistic regression.

Results : At baseline there were 384 women aged 42-53 years. Multivariable logistic regression showed that midlife women with near VI had 61% higher odds of reporting depressive symptoms (OR = 1.61, 95% CI (0.98, 2.65); P = 0.06) and this association achieved borderline statistical significance, while those with distance VI did not have a statistically significant higher odds (OR = 1.18; 95% CI (0.67, 2.11); P = 0.56). At the follow-up visit, which took place up to 10 years later (mean follow-up interval = 5 years), data were obtained from 384 women aged 51-63 years. Multivariable logistic regression showed that in the later midlife years, women with distance VI had 70% higher odds of reporting depressive symptoms (OR = 1.70, 95% CI (1.03, 2.80); P = 0.04) while those with near VI did not have a statistically significant higher odds (OR = 1.38; 95% CI (0.75, 2.53); P = 0.30).

Conclusions : VI is a factor associated with midlife depressive symptoms. Near and distance VI have varying effects on depressive symptoms during early and later midlife years. Adaptation to presbyopia during the course of midlife and onset of age-related ophthalmic diseases affecting distance vision in the later midlife years, could be factors contributing to the differential effect observed.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Table 1: Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms, Distance and Near Visual Impairment (VI)

Table 1: Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms, Distance and Near Visual Impairment (VI)

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