July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Non-mydriatic wide field fundus camera with flexible shape field of view
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meinert Jordan
    Institute of Microwaves and Photonics, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • Peter Voigtmann
    Voigtmann GmbH, Nuremberg, Germany
  • Georg Michelson
    Department of Opthalmology, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
    Talkingeyes&More GmbH, Erlangen, Germany
  • Bernhard Schmauss
    Institute of Microwaves and Photonics, Friedrich-Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Meinert Jordan, None; Peter Voigtmann, Voigtmann GmbH (E); Georg Michelson, Talkingeyes&More GmbH (E); Bernhard Schmauss, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  German BMWi ZIM Project KF2046612TS4
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 5871. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Meinert Jordan, Peter Voigtmann, Georg Michelson, Bernhard Schmauss; Non-mydriatic wide field fundus camera with flexible shape field of view. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):5871.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Non-mydriatic type fundus photography offers significantly less stress to patients in screening while it is limited in imaging area. We’ve integrated a digital micromirror device (DMD) into our camera design to get an arbitrary field of view (FOV) and fixation mark. Therefore, we are able to record an image of 68°x60° from three shots.

Methods : In contrast to common cameras our design uses a spot illumination in the pupil. This way we get reduced reflection size in horizontal direction. The resulting FOV is 68° in width and up to 25° in height at a pupil diameter as small as 2 mm. Now, we have extended the illumination path by a DMD in the image plane as shown in figure 1. With the DMD it is possible to control the light pattern in the area of 68°x45° on the retina and change it quickly.
This flexibility is used to project the FOV to areas, which are not outshined by reflections. Therefore interferences can be reduced as the intensity of the reflections are proportional to the illuminated area. The illumination area can also be limited to small regions like the disc.
While the camera shutter is closed, a fixation mark is projected into the patients eye by using the same light source and the DMD. The mark can be shaped arbitrary, it can be animated and moved to any location of the projection area.
Using the movable fixation mark, a combined FOV beyond the illumination size can be used. For a single orientation the camera is video capable with 11 frames per second.

Results : With our camera, we are efficiently able to capture a wide field fundus image at small pupil diameters. A retina image of a 68°x60° taken from three shots of our camera is shown in figure 2. While the FOV is progressively shifted downwards, the fixation is shifted upwards. The single shots have been reference subtracted, low-pass filtered, and gamma extended before stitching.

Conclusions : The interplay of adjustable FOV and fixation helps minimizing interferences. This enables wide-angle fundus imaging at pupil diameters down to 2 mm. The flexible design also allows integration of further checkups like a visual field test. Still, the design contains only common mass-market components resulting in moderate system costs.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

Fig 1: A DMD is integrated in the illumination path and projected onto the retina. The pupil is separated into a illumination area and an observation area.

Fig 1: A DMD is integrated in the illumination path and projected onto the retina. The pupil is separated into a illumination area and an observation area.

 

Fig 2: The retina has been captured by three shots through a pupil of about 2.2 mm.

Fig 2: The retina has been captured by three shots through a pupil of about 2.2 mm.

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