July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Integrated Ophthalmology-General Surgery Internship Educational Impact
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lesley Everett
    Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Saras Ramanathan
    Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Lesley Everett, None; Saras Ramanathan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 6161. doi:
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      Lesley Everett, Saras Ramanathan; Integrated Ophthalmology-General Surgery Internship Educational Impact. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):6161.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Integrated ophthalmology internships (IOI) provide more focused and relevant training than preliminary or transitional internships (non-IOIs). UCSF recently developed an Ophthalmology-Surgery IOI, completed by the current PGY-2 class. This study tests the hypothesis that participation in the IOI better prepares residents for the PGY-2 year and provides a stronger foundation in ophthalmology, as compared to non-IOIs. The relative benefits of surgical and internal medicine (IM) IOIs are compared, and UCSF outcomes will be compared to other IOIs.

Methods : Ophthalmology faculty evaluated the IOI’s impact on resident preparation for the PGY-2 year through an anonymous qualitative survey (>60% response rate). Relevant qualities of PGY-2 residents who completed the IOI were compared to previous PGY-2 residents who did not complete the IOI, with regard to preparedness for primary call, confidence, independence, surgical skills, minor procedures, ophthalmic imaging interpretation, ophthalmology knowledge, IM knowledge, exam skills, efficiency, and knowledge of the clinical sites. Faculty also evaluated the IOI’s strengths, weaknesses, and areas for improvement. Likert scale data were analyzed by t-test with post-hoc correction for multiple comparisons.

Results : PGY-2 residents who completed the IOI had statistically significantly higher scores than PGY-2 residents who did not complete the IOI in every category except for IM knowledge, which was equivalent (Fig. 1). IOI evaluations were strongly positive, especially regarding resident preparation for primary call, knowledge of the clinical sites, early initiation of research, confidence, independence, and exam skills. Fifty percent of respondents considered the educational value of a surgical IOI to be higher than that of an IM IOI, while 38% felt these would be equal. A small minority of faculty advocated for an IM IOI. Forty-four percent of respondents would choose to participate in this program, while 37% indicated “maybe” and 19% indicated “no.” Disadvantages of the IOI were considered to be difficulty of the surgical rotations (27% of respondents), potential lack of investment by surgery attendings (23%), and less IM focus (27%).

Conclusions : The UCSF Surgery IOI more successfully prepares residents for the PGY-2 year and provides valuable clinical and procedural training, as compared to non-IOIs, without sacrificing IM knowledge. Outcomes will be compared to other IOIs.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

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