July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Dopaminergic and serotoninergic signaling in black fur BL6 and albino, rag2-/-, immunodeficient BL6 mice subjected to lens-induced (LIM) and form-deprivation myopia (FDM)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Qianwen Gong
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, West China Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    Radiology, Cell Engineering, Jonhs Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Longqian Liu
    Ophthalmology and Optometry, West China Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Miroslaw Janowski
    Radiology, Cell Engineering, Jonhs Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Qianwen Gong, None; Longqian Liu, None; Miroslaw Janowski, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 704. doi:
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      Qianwen Gong, Longqian Liu, Miroslaw Janowski; Dopaminergic and serotoninergic signaling in black fur BL6 and albino, rag2-/-, immunodeficient BL6 mice subjected to lens-induced (LIM) and form-deprivation myopia (FDM). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):704.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The aim of our study was to investigate if dopamine and/or serotonin signaling is abnormal in our setting of mouse myopias and the models could be used to study therapeutic effects of transplanted cells producing these transmitters

Methods : Refractive development was measured in BL/6 mice, and albino, rag2-/- immune deficient BL6 mice from 3 weeks of age, and both FDM and LIM models were used in each of them. The refraction was measured using infrared refractometer, while the MRI have been used to measure ocular biometry. The presence of selected dopamine (D1, D4) and serotonin receptors (5HT2A, 5HT2B) in the eye was evaluated by qRT-PCR, while the concentration of dopamine and serotonin in eye tissues was measured using HPLC. We evaluated three ocular tissues known to be involved in eye refraction and myopia development: retina, sclera and cornea.

Results : LIM and FDM were successfully induced in wild-type BL/6 and immunodeficient rag2-/- mice; the refractive status of deprived eyes is significantly different from fellow eyes and the results are similar between models and mice (Figure 1). MRI showed elongation of vitreous chamber depth (VCD) in all mouse models. No significant changes in retinal, scleral, and corneal dopamine, DOPAC, and 5HT levels were detected in deprived eyes. However, we find difference in expression of dopaminergic and serotoninergic expression between myopic and fellow eyes. For D1 receptor, there was interaction of model of myopia, mouse strain, myopia induction and type of tissue. Interestingly, out of four observed differences, three concerned sclera: in FDM model induced in Bl6 mice there was decrease of dopamine in sclera, while in the same model but in Rag2 mice the effect was opposite, as well as in LIM model induced in Bl6 mice, and in retina of LIM in rag2 mice. There was observed decrease of 5HT2B receptor in myopic eye of Rag2 mice sclera, and it was particularly evidenced in LIM model (Figure 2). There is also correlation between D1 and D4 receptors and VCD.

Conclusions : There are abnormalities in dopamine and serotonin signaling in myopia models in our setting, so the models could be used to test cell therapies to prevent or even treat myopia.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

The refractive error after myopia induction

The refractive error after myopia induction

 

Delta5HT2B by eye by model LIM by mouse

Delta5HT2B by eye by model LIM by mouse

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