July 2018
Volume 59, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2018
Characteristics of Pseudomyopia and Spectacles wearing in Chinese Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meng Tian Kang
    ophthahlmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing, China
  • Shiming Li
    ophthahlmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing, China
  • Nathan G Congdon
    Queen’s University Belfast, UK, United Kingdom
  • Catherine Jan
    ophthahlmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing, China
  • Ningli Wang
    ophthahlmology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Beijing, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Meng Tian Kang, None; Shiming Li, None; Nathan Congdon, None; Catherine Jan, None; Ningli Wang, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2018, Vol.59, 3397. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Meng Tian Kang, Shiming Li, Nathan G Congdon, Catherine Jan, Ningli Wang; Characteristics of Pseudomyopia and Spectacles wearing in Chinese Children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2018;59(9):3397. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine the characteristics, prevalence and change in pseudomyopia for Chinese school aged children and investigate the condition of spectacles wearing.

Methods : A total of 2612 primary school grade one children and 1984 junior high school grade one children in Anyang Childhood Eye Study were enrolled in this study. The follow-up time was 1 year. Baseline examinations included cycloplegic refraction (cyclopentolate 1%; Canon RK-F1), eyeglass degree measurement, visual acuity and questionnaire. Pseudomyopia was defined as ≤−0.50 diopters (D) before cycloplegia and >−0.50 D after cycloplegia right eye spherical equivalent refraction. Univariate linear regression and multivariates linear regression were used to analyze the influencing factors on myopic progression.

Results : The prevalence rates of myopia were 5.7% and 62.8%, and the prevalence rates of pseudomyopia were 24.2% and 18.9% in primary school children and junior high school children respectively. The refractive status of primary school students was more centralized, and junior high school children has more disperse distribution with myopic shift (1.00[0.88]D and-1.13[2.50]D respectively). The degree of pseudomyopia is higher in primary school children than junior high school children (1.13[1.00]D and 0.38[0.75]D). In students with myopia, the proportion of uncorrected students was the highest, 82.6% and 38.4% in primary and junior high schools respectively. Among the students wearing myopic glasses, the proportion of over-correction was the highest, which was 61.5%; the proportion of under-correction in junior high school students was the highest, which was 57.1%. Multivariates model analysis showed that overcorrection, baseline myopia refraction and pseudomyopia would accelerate myopia progression. The correlation coefficient between pseudomyopia and myopia progression was very low (R2 = 0.006, P = 0.001), and was not clinically significant.

Conclusions : The spectacles wearing situation varies in Chinese myopic children,uncorrected myopia had the highest proportion; Different defocus state will impact myopia progression; Pseudomyopic children tend to wear uncorrected or undercorrected spectacles. The association between pseudomyopia and myopia progression has small coefficient and does not have clinical significance.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2018 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Honolulu, Hawaii, April 29 - May 3, 2018.

 

The correlation between false myopia power and myopia progression

The correlation between false myopia power and myopia progression

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