July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Assessment of the nonhuman primate macula across the lifespan: Thickness of retinal layers measured with sdOCT
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren Renner
    Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon, United States
  • Lily Sam
    Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon, United States
  • Martha Neuringer
    Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon, United States
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States
  • Trevor J McGill
    Casey Eye Institute, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, United States
    Neuroscience, Oregon Health & Science University, Beaverton, Oregon, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Lauren Renner, None; Lily Sam, None; Martha Neuringer, None; Trevor McGill, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH grants R01 EY018141 and P51 OD011092, Foundation Fighting Blindness, Research to Prevent Blindness
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 202. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Lauren Renner, Lily Sam, Martha Neuringer, Trevor J McGill; Assessment of the nonhuman primate macula across the lifespan: Thickness of retinal layers measured with sdOCT. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):202.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To characterize the rhesus macaque retina in vivo across the lifespan by measuring the thickness of retinal layers with spectral domain ocular coherence tomography (sdOCT) and to evaluate differences due to sex and drusen status differences.

Methods : One hundred and ten rhesus macaques ranging in age from 5-25 years were imaged by color fundus photography and sdOCT (Heidelberg Spectralis). After sedation and placement of contact lenses, 30 by 30 degree macular scans were acquired as averages of 20 B-scans with 61 slices. Eleven retinal layers were segmented by the Spectralis software (V.6.10.1, 2018) with manual correction of each slice. Layer thicknesses were measured at the foveal center, and average thicknesses were determined for the central 1 mm and the superior, inferior, nasal and temporal quadrants of the 1-2, 2-3 and 3-6 mm diameter annuli.

Results : Although total retinal thickness showed only small decreases from 5 to 25 years of age (average of 5-6% in the 2-3 and 3-6 mm annuli), statistically significant age-related changes of individual layers differed in their trajectories, with some increasing and others decreasing in thickness. Nerve fiber layer (NFL) thickness decreased by 10% in the 1-2 mm and by 14% in the 2-3 mm annulus. In contrast, the outer plexiform layer (OPL) increased by 65% in the central 1 mm, 31% in the 1-2 mm annulus, and 24% in the 2-3 and 3-6 mm annuli. RPE thickness increased by 18% in the central 1mm and by 15% in the 1-2 mm annulus, but decreased by 18% in the 3-6 mm annulus. The combined inner and outer segments decreased in thickness in all regions, exhibiting a 20% decrease in the 1 mm fovea, 17% decrease at 1-2 mm, 14% at 2-3 mm, and 11% decrease at 3-6 mms. Across the lifespan, the NFL is 3-5% thicker in females than males. Monkeys with drusen had 9-11% thicker RPE in the central 1 mm and 1-2 mm annulus than monkeys without drusen.

Conclusions : This study provides the first quantitative cross-sectional measurement of macaque retina layer thicknesses in vivo across the lifespan. This set of normative data will serve as the basis for the evaluations of alterations of macular aberrations due to nutritional or genetic abnormalities.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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