July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Objective Blur Detection Thresholds in Amblyopic and Fellow Eyes of Children with Amblyopia
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alyssa M Gehring
    Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, United States
  • Ana Juric
    Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, United States
  • Isabel A. Ricker
    Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, Ohio, United States
  • Tawna L Roberts
    Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Alyssa Gehring, None; Ana Juric, None; Isabel Ricker, None; Tawna Roberts, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH/NEI K23 EY022357
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 223. doi:
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      Alyssa M Gehring, Ana Juric, Isabel A. Ricker, Tawna L Roberts; Objective Blur Detection Thresholds in Amblyopic and Fellow Eyes of Children with Amblyopia. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):223.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess objective blur detection thresholds in the amblyopic and fellow eyes in children with amblyopia and one eye in typically developing children without amblyopia.

Methods : Accommodation was measured monocularly using the PowerRef 3 (50Hz) in 6 children with amblyopia (5-15 years) and 6 children without amblyopia (5-15 years). Subjects viewed a cartoon stimulus that was moved sinusoidally on a motorized track at 0.1Hz at 3 stimulus amplitudes (0.25, 0.50, 1.0D) for 30 seconds with a mean accommodative demand of 2D. Fourier analysis was used to assess the accommodative response for each stimulus amplitude at 0.1Hz and the adjacent frequencies. Signal response ratios (SNRs) were used to determine a positive response to the stimulus. The SNR threshold (2.3) was calculated using group SNRs obtained from the amplitude at 0.1Hz (signal) and the average of the adjacent frequencies (noise) when subjects viewed a non-moving stimulus at 50 cm for 30 seconds.

Results : In the children with amblyopia, when viewing with the fellow eye, 5 children met the SNR criteria for 1D, 4 met the criteria for 0.5D and 2 met the criteria for 0.25D. When viewing with the amblyopic eye, only 2 children met the criteria for each amplitude. In the children without amblyopia, 5 children met the criteria for 1D and 0.5D, and 4 met the criteria for 0.25D. The mean SNRs were similar at the 1D and 0.5D amplitudes and smallest in the 0.25D for both the children with amblyopia (1D: 2.6±.8; 0.5D: 3.9±2.1; 1.6±0.7) and the children without amblyopia (1D: 5.1±2.8; 0.5D: 5.5±2.8; 3.2±1.5). Despite small sample sizes, children without amblyopia had significantly greater SNRs than the fellow eye of children with amblyopia for both the 1D (P=0.054) and 0.25D (P=0.054) amplitudes but did not reach significance for the 0.5D amplitude (P=0.42). When comparing the SNRs between the fellow eye and amblyopic eye in the children with amblyopia, a difference between eyes was detected only for the 0.5D amplitude (P=0.02).

Conclusions : Children with amblyopia appear to have decreased ability to detect retinal blur in both the fellow and amblyopic eyes during monocular viewing when compared to age-matched children without amblyopia. Our data support other evidence that suggest there may be a deficit in the afferent visual pathway for both the fellow and amblyopic eyes in children with amblyopia.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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