July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Migration rate of presumed immature dendritic cells in the healthy living human cornea as imaged with In vivo corneal confocal microscopy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luisa H. Colorado
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Katie Edwards
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
  • Holly Rose Chinnery
    University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Haydee E P Bazan
    LSU Health Sciences Center, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Luisa Colorado, None; Katie Edwards, None; Holly Chinnery, None; Haydee Bazan, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 898. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Luisa H. Colorado, Katie Edwards, Holly Rose Chinnery, Haydee E P Bazan; Migration rate of presumed immature dendritic cells in the healthy living human cornea as imaged with In vivo corneal confocal microscopy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):898. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Migration rate of presumed immature dendritic cells (imDCs) in the living human cornea has never being explored. We performed this novel observational study to determine imDCs migration rate in the central cornea in an acute (40 minutes) and longitudinal (one week) setting.

Methods : In vivo corneal confocal microscopy was performed on the right central cornea of a healthy 41 year old female examined with the same methodology in two separate occasions, one week apart. Five series of images were acquired every 10 minutes with the purpose of producing a two-dimensional “time lapse” image sequence of the human imDCs at the central sub-basal corneal nerve plexus at each session. A graphics program was used to arrange a sequence of images obtained at each session into a sequence of five images from the exact same location within the sub basal nerve plexus of the central cornea. Corneal nerve features were used as landmarks for re-identification and to determine position imDCs.

Results : Over the 40-minute period, the presumed imDCs appeared to migrate in random directions with respect to the nerves. Cell movement was observed in the space between visible nerve fibres as well as crossing main nerve fibres and branches. imDCs were observed both individually and in clusters? in the two visits. The migration rate of presumed imDCs from a healthy individual was approximately 0.72µm/min as observed in the two separate visits. These cell bodies, which lacked visible dendrites, appeared and then disappeared from the level of the nerve plexus when followed over the 40-minute period. The presumed imDCs observed one week earlier did not correspond with those in the second visit images.

Conclusions : This novel study provides strong evidence that the living human imDCs at the sub-basal corneal nerve plexus are highly dynamic cells that clearly migrate in the axial direction (or XYZ) within the healthy cornea. imDCs are possibly acting as surveillance in case of immune cell activation in the central cornea.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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