July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Optical density ratio – a prognostic marker for chronicity in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meira Neudorfer
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Noam Brakin
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Adiel Barak
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Dinah Zur
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Anat Loewenstein
    Department of Ophthalmology, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Iris Moroz
    Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Ari Leshno
    Goldschleger Eye Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel, Israel
    Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Meira Neudorfer, None; Noam Brakin, None; Adiel Barak, None; Dinah Zur, None; Anat Loewenstein, None; Iris Moroz, None; Ari Leshno, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NONE
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 1589. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Meira Neudorfer, Noam Brakin, Adiel Barak, Dinah Zur, Anat Loewenstein, Iris Moroz, Ari Leshno; Optical density ratio – a prognostic marker for chronicity in Central Serous Chorioretinopathy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):1589.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Central serous chorioretinopathy (CSR) can be classified according to its clinical course to acute or and chronic. Acute CSR usually resolves spontaneously within2–3 months. Knowing the potential chronicity at presentation can improve treatment and management of the disease. We investigated the clinical significance and prognostic value of the sub-retinal fluid (SRF) optical density ratio (ODR) in CSR at presentation.

Methods : Medical charts of patients diagnosed with CSR were retrospectively reviewed for cases with follow-up of at least 3 months for whom optical coherence tomography (OCT) was done at presentation prior to any intervention and showed sufficient SRF for sampling. Optical density (OD) measurements were obtained using ImageJ and ODRs were calculated as SRF OD divided by vitreous OD. Subjects were categorized as acute or chronic based on the presence of SRF at follow-up.

Results : Thirty-nine eyes of 41 men and 9 women (mean age 41.4 ±9.1) met the inclusion criteria. Three months from presentation, SRF had absorbed in 19 cases (acute group) and remained in 20 (chronic group). There were no significant differences between the groups at presentation in age, sex, visual acuity, and OCT image acquisition parameters. Baseline ODR was significantly higher in the chronic group (1.032±0.321 versus 0.798+0.267 in the acute group, P=0.018). Visual acuity at follow-up was significantly better in the acute group than the chronic group (0.03±0.05 versus 0.12+0.16, respectively, P=0.035). No significant differences were found in choroidal thickness and the need for treatment. Base line maximal retinal thickness was significantly higher in the chronic group compared to the acute group (496.8±70.7 versus 586.7±160.5microns respectively, P=0.040).

Conclusions : ODR can be a useful prognostic marker for chronicity in CSR.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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