July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Meibomian gland and ocular surface changes during high fat diet feeding in mice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eugene Osae
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Justin Courson
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Angie De La Cruz
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Madhavi Chintalapati
    Leukocyte Biology, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Tiffany Bullock
    Leukocyte Biology, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Rachel L Redfern
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Samuel Hanlon
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Rolando E Rumbaut
    Leukocyte Biology, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
    Center for Translational Research on Inflammatory Diseases, Michael E DeBakey VA Medical Center, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Clifton Wayne Smith
    Leukocyte Biology, Department of Pediatrics, Children’s Nutrition Research Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Alan Burns
    University of Houston College of Optometry, Houston, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Eugene Osae, None; Justin Courson, None; Angie De La Cruz, None; Madhavi Chintalapati, None; Tiffany Bullock, None; Rachel Redfern, None; Samuel Hanlon, None; Rolando Rumbaut, None; Clifton Smith, None; Alan Burns, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH-NEI RO1 EY 018239 NIH-NEI P30EY007551 The American Academy of Optometry Foundation Joseph T Barr Early Career Cornea and Contact Lens Research Award
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 1748. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Eugene Osae, Justin Courson, Angie De La Cruz, Madhavi Chintalapati, Tiffany Bullock, Rachel L Redfern, Samuel Hanlon, Rolando E Rumbaut, Clifton Wayne Smith, Alan Burns; Meibomian gland and ocular surface changes during high fat diet feeding in mice. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):1748.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : High fat diet (HFD) can lead to metabolic syndrome with characteristic dyslipidemia, abdominal obesity, hypertension, hyperglycemia and insulin resistance. Metabolic syndrome is thought to be linked to Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) and MGD is associated with ocular surface changes including dry eye syndrome. The purpose of this study was to determine if HFD alters Meibomian gland structure, corneal epithelial surface organization and tear production in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity.

Methods : Five-week old male C57/BL6 mice were fed a normal diet (ND; 15% kcal fat) or a HFD (42% kcal fat) for 5 or 21 weeks. Cochet-Bonnet aesthesiometry (filament thickness 0.12mm) was performed to evaluate corneal nerve sensitivity. Phenol red thread test was performed for 15 seconds to measure tear volume in awake mice. Corneal epithelial surface microplicae were examined using a TESCAN MIRA 3 scanning electron microscope (SEM). Meibography was performed on excised whole eyelids and Meibomian gland (MG) area was determined using ImageJ software. Data analysis was performed using unpaired two-tailed t-test and expressed as mean± standard deviation.

Results : As found previously, compared to mice fed a ND, mice on a HFD gained more weight at 5 weeks (36.3 ±4.8 g vs 30.0±1.7g, p < 0.05) and at 21 weeks (50.6 ±1.6 vs 41.0±1.8g, p<0.05) and exhibited ≈ 50% reduction in corneal nerve sensitivity where more pressure was needed to elicit a blink response (0.9±0.2 vs 0.6±0.1g/mm2, p <0.05) at 5 weeks feeding but not at 21 weeks. Tear production was elevated (≈1.5-fold, p<0.05) after both 5 and 21 weeks on the HFD. SEM imaging suggested fewer corneal epithelial microplicae (consistent with a compromised epithelial surface) after 21 weeks on the HFD. MG hypertrophy was evident on HFD feeding after 5 and 21 weeks (16-18% increase in total Meibomian gland area).

Conclusions : The mouse model of metabolic syndrome shows ocular surface changes (loss of corneal sensitivity) and pathologic changes consistent with a dry eye phenotype and MGD. The increased tear volume seen in the obese mice resembles the watery eyes (epiphora) experienced by many MGD patients.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×