July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Ganglion cell layer thickness on optical coherence tomography allows differentiation of MS patients without optic neuritis from age-matched controls.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Vanessa Bachir
    Optometry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
    Institut de l'Oeil des Laurentides, Boisbriand, Quebec, Canada
  • Julie-Andrée Marinier
    Optometry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Walter Wittich
    Optometry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Lara Tchakmakian
    Optometry, University of Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Vanessa Bachir, None; Julie-Andrée Marinier, None; Walter Wittich, None; Lara Tchakmakian, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  FRSQ and CIHR
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 2289. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Vanessa Bachir, Julie-Andrée Marinier, Walter Wittich, Lara Tchakmakian; Ganglion cell layer thickness on optical coherence tomography allows differentiation of MS patients without optic neuritis from age-matched controls.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):2289. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a highly reproducible and accurate potential biomarker for monitoring disease progression in patients with MS. Both the optic nerve and macula can be affected in MS patients with and without prior optic neuritis. However, the magnitude of these anatomical changes, their clinical significance and correlation to visual function is not well established. We hypothesized that MS patients without optic neuritis would show more significant thinning at the macula. We expected OCT findings to also correlate with subclinical changes in visual function.

Methods : Participants were subdivided into three groups: MS with past optic neuritis (MSON, n=29) or absence of past optic neuritis (MSNON, n=28) and age-matched controls (n=19). We measured high and low contrast distance and near visual acuity (ETDRS, Sloan 10% contrast), contrast sensitivity (CS) (Mars, CamBlobs), reading acuity (MNRead), automated visual field (Octopus G-Top), fundus photography and Spectralis OCT (RNFL, macular thickness, ganglion cell layer (GCL) thickness). In the MSNON and control group, only data from the right eye were included. In the MSON group, only the eye with prior optic neuritis was included.

Results : Macular GCL thickness was significantly decreased (p = .01, Cohen’s d = .93) in the MSNON group compared to controls. Interestingly, neither total macular thickness nor peripapillary RNFL global thickness showed significant thinning in MSNON eyes compared to controls. CamBlobs CS was the only visual function parameter that showed a significant decrease in MSNON eyes compared to controls (p< .05, d = 1.27). The only significant correlations between structure and function in the MSNON group were between total macular thickness and Mars CS (r = .448, p = .02), and between GCL thickness and Camblobs CS (r = .55, p = .04).

Conclusions : These results are consistent with our hypothesis that macular OCT testing is more significantly affected than peripapillary RNFL thickness in patients with MS without optic neuritis. Most commonly tested visual parameters were unaffected in this group compared to controls, which further validates the important role of OCT testing in these patients. Macular GCL thickness can help detect subtle structural changes which may precede visual dysfunction.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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