July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Supplementation with n3 Fatty Acids to Improve VLC-PUFA Levels in Diabetic Animal Models
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aruna Gorusupudi
    Dept of Ophthalmology and Visual Sci, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
  • Fu-Yen Chang
    Dept of Ophthalmology and Visual Sci, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
  • Kelly Nelson
    Dept of Ophthalmology and Visual Sci, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
  • Gregory S Hageman
    Dept of Ophthalmology and Visual Sci, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
  • Paul S Bernstein
    Dept of Ophthalmology and Visual Sci, Moran Eye Center, Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Aruna Gorusupudi, None; Fu-Yen Chang, None; Kelly Nelson, None; Gregory Hageman, None; Paul Bernstein, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH EY14800
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 2665. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Aruna Gorusupudi, Fu-Yen Chang, Kelly Nelson, Gregory S Hageman, Paul S Bernstein; Supplementation with n3 Fatty Acids to Improve VLC-PUFA Levels in Diabetic Animal Models. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):2665.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The main causative factors for diabetic retinopathy are hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. Decreased serum n3/n6 ratios (omega-3 index) observed in diabetic patients are indicative of chronic inflammation and could be a contributing factor for diabetic retinopathy. n3 fatty acids are not only biologically active molecules, but they also give rise to other biologically active non-dietary molecules such as very long chain-polyunsaturated fatty acids (VLC-PUFAs) and neuroprotectins which can play major roles in pathological processes. VLC-PUFAs are a special class of fatty acids present only in the vertebrate retina that are responsible for membrane fluidity in the photoreceptors. We observed a significant drop in VLC-PUFA levels and alterations to their n3/n6 ratios in retinal punches from patients with diabetic retinopathy, compared to those of diabetic and age-matched controls. We chose to study the effect of n-3 PUFA supplementation on VLC-PUFA levels in two spontaneous diabetic models: heterozygous Ins2Akita (Akita) mice and Nile grass rats. We hypothesize that treatment with VLC-PUFA precursor n3 fatty acids could improve serum adiponectin levels and omega-3 index and retinal n3/n6 VLC-PUFA ratios and levels, thereby slowing retinopathy.

Methods : Akita and WT (C57B6L) mice (n=6/group) were fed with custom formulated fish oil (2:1v/v, 1.2 g/kg/day) diet for eight weeks. Diabetic Nile grass rats, were fed with fish oil mixed with pellet diet for 8 weeks. Animals were sacrificed, and serum, liver, brain and eye tissues were harvested. Retinas were separated from RPE and used for VLC-PUFA analysis. Using a standardized method, fatty acid methyl esters were extracted and then analyzed by GC-MS.

Results : After two months of supplementation with n-3 PUFA rich fish oil, there was a significant increase in n-3/n-6 VLC-PUFA ratios in both models compared to diabetic controls who were not fed fish oil. We also observed a decrease in serum blood glucose and an increase in serum adiponectin levels. The fish oil supplemented Akita mice had lower adiponectin levels when compared to control Akita mice.

Conclusions : Our results indicate that VLC-PUFA levels were lower in diabetes and diabetic retinopathy, suggesting that dietary supplementation with n3 LC-PUFAs may help to prevent progression of diabetes and associated retinopathy

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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