July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Social interaction in children with visual disabilities who live in a developing country II: functional mobility.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • João Victor Ramos Toledo Negrao
    Oftalmologia, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, Santana de Parnaíba, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Tais Siqueira Venancio
    Oftalmologia, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, Santana de Parnaíba, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Livia Andrade Freire
    Oftalmologia, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, Santana de Parnaíba, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Bruna Michelle Freire de Araújo
    Oftalmologia, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, Santana de Parnaíba, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Niro Kasahara
    Oftalmologia, Santa Casa de Misericórdia de São Paulo, Santana de Parnaíba, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   João Victor Negrao, None; Tais Venancio, None; Livia Freire, None; Bruna Michelle de Araújo, None; Niro Kasahara, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 3623. doi:https://doi.org/
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      João Victor Ramos Toledo Negrao, Tais Siqueira Venancio, Livia Andrade Freire, Bruna Michelle Freire de Araújo, Niro Kasahara; Social interaction in children with visual disabilities who live in a developing country II: functional mobility.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):3623. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The functional status in children and youth with different systemic conditions has been studied extensively. Little is known on how vision status interferes with the functional status especially in children living in non-industrialized countries. This was a cross-sectional study to assess the functional status in a developing country children with visual disabilities using the Pediatric Evaluation of Disability Inventory (PEDI).

Methods : Patients were recruited from a general ophthalmology clinic. Children with visual disabilities underwent a complete eye examination including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (VA), biomicroscopy, and ophthalmoscopy. Everyday functioning was described in children with visual disabilities using the three scales of the PEDI (version 1.0): functional skills, caregiver assistance, and modifications of the environment.

Results : The study sample comprised 32 children with a mean VA of 0.6; 17 had strabismus, 10 congenital cataract, 2 nystagmus, 2 congenital glaucoma, and 1 albinism; mean age was 8.0 ± 2.6 years. A large variability in functioning in mobility, self-care, and social function was seen because of the heterogeneity of children with visual disabilities. Limitations in achievement of activities, need for assistance, and use of assistive devices increased progressively with visual deficit (P < 0.000).

Conclusions : All three domains of the PEDI represent different but strongly related aspects of everyday functioning in young children with visual disabilities who live in a developing country.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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