July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Social interaction in children with visual disabilities who live in a developing country III: health-related quality of life.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tais Siqueira Venancio
    Ophalmology, Santa Casa Misericórdia de São Paulo, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Bruna Michelle Freire de Araújo
    Ophalmology, Santa Casa Misericórdia de São Paulo, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Livia Andrade Freire
    Ophalmology, Santa Casa Misericórdia de São Paulo, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • João Victor Ramos de Toledo Negrão
    Ophalmology, Santa Casa Misericórdia de São Paulo, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • NELSON DE ALMEIDA FILHO
    Ophalmology, Faculdade de Medicina do ABC, Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Niro Kasahara
    Ophalmology, Santa Casa Misericórdia de São Paulo, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Tais Venancio, None; Bruna Michelle de Araújo, None; Livia Freire, None; João Victor Negrão, None; NELSON ALMEIDA FILHO, None; Niro Kasahara, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 3624. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Tais Siqueira Venancio, Bruna Michelle Freire de Araújo, Livia Andrade Freire, João Victor Ramos de Toledo Negrão, NELSON DE ALMEIDA FILHO, Niro Kasahara; Social interaction in children with visual disabilities who live in a developing country III: health-related quality of life.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):3624. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Health-related quality of life (QoL) refers to the subset of QoL directly related to an individual’s health and includes both physical, mental, and social well-being. The negative effects of visual disabilities in childhood on QoL have been shown in clinical samples from industrialized nations but not yet in low/middle income community populations. This was a cross-sectional, case-control study to determine relationships between visual dysfunction and health-related QoL reported by parent-proxy and child self-report in a population sample of developing country children.

Methods : Children with visual disabilities and age-matched normal controls underwent a complete eye examination and answered the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ (PedsQL™) version 4.0. Patients were recruited from a general ophthalmology clinic. Scores were calculated for each group and compared with unpaired Student’s t test.

Results : The study group comprised 32 children with a mean visual acuity (VA) of 0.6; 17 had strabismus, 10 congenital cataract, 2 nystagmus, 2 congenital glaucoma, and 1 albinism; mean age was 8.9 ± 2.6 years. The age-matched control group comprised 28 children with mean VA of 0.1; mean age was 10.1 ± 1.4 years.
Pediatric patients with visual disabilities self-reported progressively more impaired overall QoL than controls, with medium to large effect sizes (65.3 ± 21.2 and 79.2 ± 8.2, respectively, P = 0.022). Parent proxy-reports generally paralleled patient self-report, with several notable differences.

Conclusions : The results demonstrate differential effects of pediatric visual conditions on patient QoL utilizing the PedsQL™ from the perspectives of children and parents in a developing country. These findings have clinical implications for the healthcare services provided for children with visual disabilities.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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