July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
An Adherence Survey into the use of eye drops in Inflammatory Eye Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hedayat Javidi
    Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Inflammatory Eye Disease Service, Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Natraj Poonit
    Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Inflammatory Eye Disease Service, Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Radhika Pooja Patel
    Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Inflammatory Eye Disease Service, Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Robert John Barry
    Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Inflammatory Eye Disease Service, Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Saaeha Rauz
    Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Inflammatory Eye Disease Service, Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Philip Ian Murray
    Academic Unit of Ophthalmology, Institute of Inflammation and Ageing, Birmingham, United Kingdom
    Inflammatory Eye Disease Service, Birmingham & Midland Eye Centre, Birmingham, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Hedayat Javidi, None; Natraj Poonit, None; Radhika Patel, None; Robert Barry, None; Saaeha Rauz, None; Philip Murray, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 5443. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Hedayat Javidi, Natraj Poonit, Radhika Pooja Patel, Robert John Barry, Saaeha Rauz, Philip Ian Murray; An Adherence Survey into the use of eye drops in Inflammatory Eye Disease. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):5443. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Patients with Inflammatory Eye Disease often need long-term eye drop treatment. This may require the instillation of multiple eye drops at varying frequencies throughout the day with the potential to lead to confusion and poor adherence to treatment that could significantly impact on prognosis. We wished to evaluate adherence to topical therapy in patients with Inflammatory Eye Disease in a tertiary Eye Centre, and to identify factors that may influence this.

Methods : Data were collected from consecutive patients attending uveitis and ocular surface disease clinics between 1/08/18 to 26/11/18 who were using topical therapy. A questionnaire was designed that detailed treatment regimen, self-reported estimations of adherence to treatment and the main reason for failure to adhere. Clinical diagnosis and treatment regimen were validated against clinic letters using the Winscribe™ and Medisoft™ hospital software. A clinician completed the survey with each patient.

Results : A total of 86 patients were included: 51 uveitis patients and 35 ocular surface disease patients. Of these, 29% (25/86) of patients failed to identify 1 or more of the eye drops they were using, with 28% (24/86) unable to offer the correct indication for their treatment. Fifty five (64%) patients reported failing to put their eye drops in, with 15 (27%) of these estimating this to be on a daily basis. The mean 4-week failure rate was 7%, with the most common reason offered being forgetfulness (30%). Of the 58 patients using multiple eye drops, 22% (13/58) reported insufficient time intervals between successive eye drops, with 58% (50/86) of all participants recalling no instruction on how to instil eye drops.

Conclusions : Despite counselling in clinic by medical staff and patients receiving letters after their clinic appointment detailing their treatment, self-reported eye drop adherence in patients with Inflammatory Eye Disease is 71%. We highlight poor rates of correct intervals between eye drops and concordance with treatment that can impact upon clinical outcomes. We recommend dedicated practitioner in the clinical environment, such as an ophthalmic pharmacist, providing a more proactive approach to patient education of topical therapy (indication and treatment) to improve adherence.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×