July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Compliance rates in children using soft bifocal contact lenses and 0.01% atropine
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Juan Huang
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Donald O Mutti
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Bradley E Dougherty
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Lisa A Jones-Jordan
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Jeffrey J Walline
    The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Juan Huang, None; Donald Mutti, None; Bradley Dougherty, None; Lisa A Jones-Jordan, None; Jeffrey Walline, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NIH K23EY025273
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 5825. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Juan Huang, Donald O Mutti, Bradley E Dougherty, Lisa A Jones-Jordan, Jeffrey J Walline; Compliance rates in children using soft bifocal contact lenses and 0.01% atropine. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):5825. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The Bifocal & Atropine in Myopia (BAM) Study investigates whether combining +2.50-D add soft bifocal contact lenses (SBCL) and 0.01% atropine slows myopia progression more than SBCL alone. This study aims to examine compliance with SBCL and atropine combination treatment.

Methods : Children (n = 49) aged 7 to 11 years received daily combination treatment of 0.01% atropine (one drop in each eye before bed) and +2.50-D add SBCL for one year. The children and their parents completed surveys regarding SBCL and atropine usage two weeks after receiving the treatment (baseline) and at one year. Compliance was evaluated based on reported SBCL wear time (hours per week) and days per week of atropine use. Regression analyses were used to examine factors associated with compliance. Covariates included subjects’ age and gender; high and low contrast logMAR visual acuity (VA); ratings of vision, eye comfort, and difficulty in handling SBCL.

Results : Surveys indicated the subjects wore SBCL 75.2 ± 23.9 hours per week at baseline, and 79.4 ± 19.8 hours per week at one year (p = 0.16). Low contrast VA decreased significantly at one year compared to baseline (baseline = +0.08 ± 0.07, one year = +0.16 ± 0.09; p < 0.001). Satisfaction with SBCL was greater and insertion of SBCL was rated easier (p < 0.05) at one year than baseline. None of the other covariates was significantly different between baseline and one year. Regression models suggested that at baseline, more SBCL wear time was significantly associated with older age and better comfort during the evening (p < 0.001). At one year visit, more SBCL wear time was significantly associated with older age and easier SBCL insertion (p < 0.001). None of the other covariates was significantly associated with SBCL wear time. Atropine use was not significantly different (p = 0.54) between baseline (6.5 ± 0.7 days) and one year (6.4 ± 1.1 days). Parental survey indicated all the children at baseline and 98% of children at one year used atropine at least 5 days per week.

Conclusions : Subjects were compliant with the combination treatment and tolerated the treatment well. Older age was associated with more SBCL wear time. Wear time for SBCL novices was longer when lenses were more comfortable at baseline, perhaps because most subjects were learning how to handle lenses, but SBCL wear time was longer for experienced adapted wearers when lenses were easier to insert.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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