July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Oral lactoferrin administration suppresses lens-induced myopia in mice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shin-ichi Ikeda
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Toshihide Kurihara
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Xiaoyan Jiang
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Masataro Toda
    Laboratory of Photobiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Kazuo Tsubota
    Department of Ophthalmology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Shin-ichi Ikeda, Keio University (P), Tsubota Laboratory, Inc, (F); Toshihide Kurihara, Keio University (P), Tsubota Laboratory, Inc, (F); Xiaoyan Jiang, Keio University (P), Tsubota Laboratory, Inc, (F); Masataro Toda, None; Kazuo Tsubota, Keio University (P), Tsubota Laboratory, Inc, (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 5890. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Shin-ichi Ikeda, Toshihide Kurihara, Xiaoyan Jiang, Masataro Toda, Kazuo Tsubota; Oral lactoferrin administration suppresses lens-induced myopia in mice. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):5890. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Recent studies showed an association between myopia development and local ocular inflammation. Lactoferrin (LF) is hemeprotein being contained in saliva, tear and mother’s milk, which has antibacterial activity through chelating iron ion. It is also known that LF also has an anti-inflammatory effect. In this study, we sought to determine whether LF has a suppressive effect against myopia progression using murine lens-induced myopia (LIM) model.

Methods : Male C57BL/6J mice (3 weeks old, n=8) were divided into two groups, one group orally administrated LF (1600mg/kg/day, from 3-week-old to 7-week-old) and the other group administrated same volume of ringer solution as a control. At 4-week-old, mice were subjected to wear -30 diopter (D) lens on right eye and flame without lens on left eye, respectively. Before and 3 weeks after wearing (at 4-week-old and 7-week-old), the refraction and the axial length were measured using a refractometer and a SD-OCT system in both eyes.

Results : In ringer-administrated group, minus lens-worn eyes showed a refractive error shift (means ± standard deviation, flame eyes: +1.01±2.79 D, -30D eyes: -10.12±3.98 D, p=0.001) and an axial length elongation (difference of axial length, frame eyes: 0.162±0.019 mm, -30 D eyes: 0.204±0.017 mm, p=0.012) indicating a successful induction of myopia in C57BL6/J mice. On the other hands, in LF group, there are no significant differences in refractive error (means ± standard deviation, flame eyes: -1.45±2.10 D, -30D eyes: -5.82±2.30 D, p=0.195) and axial length elongation (difference of axial length, frame eyes: 0.166±0.011 mm, -30 D eyes: 0.175±0.014 mm, p=0.849) .

Conclusions : Present study demonstrated that oral administration of LF suppressed lens-induced myopia development in mice.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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