July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Macular pigment and low luminance vision in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Krista Christensen
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Zhe Liu
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • James N Ver Hoeve
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • James Stringham
    Duke Eye Center, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Yao Liu
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Robert Wallace
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Karen Gehrs
    University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, United States
  • Lesley Tinker
    Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Tom Lawler
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Julie A Mares
    University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Krista Christensen, None; Zhe Liu, None; James Ver Hoeve, None; James Stringham, None; Yao Liu, None; Robert Wallace, None; Karen Gehrs, None; Lesley Tinker, None; Tom Lawler, None; Julie Mares, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This work was supported by National Eye Institute grants EY016886 and EY025292. This work was also supported in part by an unrestricted grant from Research to Prevent Blindness, Inc. to the UW Madison Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, and in part by a National Eye Institute Vision Research Core grant (P30 EY016665) to the UW Madison Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences. It is an ancillary study to WHI and the WHI program is funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health through contracts N01WH22110, 24152, 32100-2, 32105-6, 32108-9, 32111-13, 32115, 32118-32119, 32122, 2107-26, 42129-32, and 44221.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 5914. doi:
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      Krista Christensen, Zhe Liu, James N Ver Hoeve, James Stringham, Yao Liu, Robert Wallace, Karen Gehrs, Lesley Tinker, Tom Lawler, Julie A Mares; Macular pigment and low luminance vision in the Carotenoids in Age-Related Eye Disease Study (CAREDS), an ancillary study of the Women’s Health Initiative. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):5914.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Macular pigment (MP), comprised of lutein (L) and isomers of zeaxanthin (Z), may protect the retina and thus slow decline of low luminance (rod-mediated) vision. There are few studies evaluating this possibility, and relations of MP optical density (MPOD) with rod-mediated vision have been inconsistent across age and eye disease groups. We evaluated the association of MPOD to (1) rod intercept time (RIT) and (2) low luminance questionnaire (LLQ) scores, in a longitudinal study of post-menopausal women.

Methods : This analysis includes 610 women aged 53-86 years with MPOD measured at CAREDS baseline (2001-2004, n=1804), who survived, consented to be contacted, participated in CAREDS2 (2016-2018), and completed the LLQ. Of these, 186 had RIT measured at CAREDS2 study visits. RIT was measured at 5 degrees retinal eccentricity using the AdaptDx device. MPOD was measured at 0.5 degrees (reference of 7 degrees) using customized heterochromatic flicker photometry. L/Z intake was estimated from responses to food frequency and supplement questionnaires. Age-adjusted mean LLQ scores and RIT were computed by MPOD and L/Z quintile using generalized linear models.

Results : MPOD at baseline was not associated with RIT at follow-up (mean [SD] times of 12.2 [1.4] and 10.0 [1.4] minutes in the highest and lowest quintiles, Ptrend=0.49). There was little difference in LLQ score by MPOD at baseline (mean [SD] scores of 77.5 [1.5] and 78.3 [1.5] points in the highest and lowest quintiles, Ptrend=0.52). Results were similar after excluding women with lens opacities or age-related macular degeneration. By contrast, women in the lowest quintile for intake of L/Z at baseline had longer RIT at follow-up compared with women in quintiles 2-5.

Conclusions : Contrary to results in younger samples, in older women neither dark adaptation speed nor self-reported low luminance vision was related to MPOD at 0.5 degrees. However, we found faster dark adaptation at follow-up in women with higher L/Z intakes at baseline, which suggests L/Z might protect against loss of rod-mediated vision over time. The lack of a relationship between MPOD and RIT may be partly explained by the light filtering properties of MP, which may have reduced the light stimulus in dark adaptation testing and resulted in longer RIT for those with higher MPOD.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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