July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Shape discrimination ability and disability glare in orthokeratology children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jun Jiang
    Optometry Clinic, Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Binbin Su
    Optometry Clinic, Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Ling zhou
    Optometry Clinic, Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Bin Zhang
    College of Optometry, Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, United States
    Optometry Clinic, Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Fan Lu
    Optometry Clinic, Eye Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jun Jiang, None; Binbin Su, None; Ling zhou, None; Bin Zhang, None; Fan Lu, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6336. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jun Jiang, Binbin Su, Ling zhou, Bin Zhang, Fan Lu; Shape discrimination ability and disability glare in orthokeratology children. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6336. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : A reported complaint in orthokeratology treatment is the disturbing glare whose mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we measured the changes in shape discrimination ability, with and without the presence of transient disability glare, during the first month in children who underwent orthokeratology treatment.

Methods : Forty-nine eyes from 49 children (age: 11.49±2.02 years) with mean spherical equivalent refractive error -3.23±1.09D were included into this prospective study. Radial frequency (RF) patterns with radial frequency of 4 cycles/360°, peak spatial frequency of 3 cycles/degree, and mean radius of 1.5 degrees were used as the visual stimuli. Shape discrimination thresholds (SDT), with and without glare, were measured using a 2-down-1-up staircase procedure. SDTglare was defined as the difference between the SDTs with and without the presence of glare. Measurements were done at baseline with frame spectacles, and days 7 and 30 of after treatment with naked eyes.

Results : No statistically significant differences were observed between the SDTs without glare obtained at baseline and 1 week and 1 month after orthokeratology lens wear (P > 0.05). With transient glare, SDTs in all subjects were significantly higher than SDTs without glare (P < 0.05). SDTs with glare on day 7 and day 30 were significantly lower than baseline (P < 0.05). Compared with baseline, SDTglare significantly decreased at 1 week and 1 month after orthokeratology lens wear (P < 0.05).

Conclusions : While SDT without glare was stable following orthokeratology treatment, SDT with glare decreased during the first month of treatment. This short-term reduction in SDT may be the combined effect of spectacle removal, subtle changes in cornea optical quality, and the neural adaptation.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×