July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
What are the effects of a short term interruption in contact lens wear on the suprathreshold response among symptomatic wearers?
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ping Situ
    School of Optometry, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, United States
  • Carolyn G. Begley
    School of Optometry, Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, United States
  • Trefford L Simpson
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Ping Situ, CooperVision Inc. (F); Carolyn Begley, CooperVision Inc. (F); Trefford Simpson, CooperVision Inc. (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported by a grant from CooperVision Inc.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6354. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Ping Situ, Carolyn G. Begley, Trefford L Simpson; What are the effects of a short term interruption in contact lens wear on the suprathreshold response among symptomatic wearers?. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6354. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To investigate the changes in sensory responses to suprathreshold corneal stimuli following a 2-week interruption in contact lens wear (CL) among symptomatic CL wearers

Methods : 49 adapted CL and 15 non-CL wearing normal subjects participated in the study. CL wearers were subdivided into symptomatic and asymptomatic groups based on comfortable wearing time (< 8 hours) and CLDEQ-8 score (≧14). Based on each subject’s threshold, pneumatic stimuli (delivered using a computerized Belmonte esthesiometer) ranged from threshold to approximately 2 times threshold and were equally divided into five levels, Stimuli were presented in a random order with a minimum of a one minute interstimulus interval. The magnitude of the sensory response to stimuli was assessed for intensity, coolness, irritation and pain, using a 0 (none) to 100 (very strong) scale. Measurements were taken at baseline (with habitual CL wear), after 2 weeks of no-CL and after restarting CL wear for 2 weeks.

Results : There was a group difference in the estimated magnitude of intensity and irritation (p=0.007 and p<0.001, respectively). Post hoc tests showed that the magnitude of the symptomatic group was significantly higher compared to the control and asymptomatic groups (Tukey HSD all p≤ 0.012). The group difference in estimated magnitude of irritation was dependent on visits (p< 0.001); the magnitude of irritation in the symptomatic group was significantly lower following 2-week of no-CL compared to the baseline (p=0.001) and tended to increase after wearing CL for 2 weeks compared to no-CL (p=0.057).

Conclusions : The symptomatic contact lens wearers showed an enhanced responsiveness to supra-threshold stimuli at baseline, reporting stronger intensity and greater irritation. The magnitude of irritation decreased, following a 2-week interruption in contact lens wear, but worsened after 2-week resuming CL wear.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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