July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Prevalence of pterygium and its associations in a Russian population: the Ural Eye and Medical Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Renat Kazakbaev
    Ufa Eye Research Institute, Ufa, Russian Federation
  • Mukharram Bikbov
    Ufa Eye Research Institute, Ufa, Russian Federation
  • Timur Gilmanshin
    Ufa Eye Research Institute, Ufa, Russian Federation
  • Rinat Zainullin
    Ufa Eye Research Institute, Ufa, Russian Federation
  • Gyulli Kazakbaeva
    Ufa Eye Research Institute, Ufa, Russian Federation
  • Songhomitra Panda-Jonas
    Department of Ophthalmology, Medical Faculty Mannheim of the Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany
  • Jost B Jonas
    Department of Ophthalmology, Medical Faculty Mannheim of the Ruprecht-Karls-University of Heidelberg, Mannheim, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Renat Kazakbaev, None; Mukharram Bikbov, None; Timur Gilmanshin, None; Rinat Zainullin, None; Gyulli Kazakbaeva, None; Songhomitra Panda-Jonas, None; Jost Jonas, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6479. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Renat Kazakbaev, Mukharram Bikbov, Timur Gilmanshin, Rinat Zainullin, Gyulli Kazakbaeva, Songhomitra Panda-Jonas, Jost B Jonas; Prevalence of pterygium and its associations in a Russian population: the Ural Eye and Medical Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6479. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To assess the prevalence of pterygium and its associations in a Russian population.

Methods : The population-based Ural Eye and Medical Study was carried out in a rural and an urban area in the region of Ufa / Bashkortostan 1400 km East of Moscow. Out of 7328 eligible individuals aged 40+ years, 5,899 (80.5%) individuals participated and underwent an ocular and general examination. Pterygium was diagnosed during slit lamp examination and on corneal photographs.

Results : Data on the presence of pterygia were available for 5888 (99.8%) individuals. The mean prevalence of pterygia (any eye) was 138/5888 (2.3%;95% confidence intervals (CI):2.0,2.7). Bilateral pterygia were detected in 45 individuals (0.8%) and they were unilateral in 93 individuals (1.5%). The pterygium prevalence increased from 0.8% (95%CI:0.02,1.6) in the age group from 40-<45 years to 3.6% (95%CI:2.1,5.1) in the age group of 75+ years. In multivariate analysis, a higher prevalence of pterygium was associated with older age (P=0.006; OR: 1.03; 95%CI: 1.01, 1.04), rural versus urban region of habitation (P< 0.001; OR: 2.33; 95%CI: 1.57, 3.46) and lower level of education (P=0.03; OR: 0.89; 95%CI: 0.81, 0.99), while in that model the pterygium prevalence was statistically independent of sex (P=.34), Russian versus non-Russian ethnicity (P=0.59), presence of diabetes mellitus (P=1.00), arterial hypertension (P=0.86), vegetarian versus mixed diet (P=1.00), blood lipids (P>0.30), history of cardiovascular disease (P=0.49), or axial length (P=0.52).

Conclusions : In this rural and urban, typically multi-ethnic Russian study population aged 40+years, a higher prevalence of pterygium (mean: 2.3%) was correlated with older age, rural versus urban region of habitation and lower level of education while it was statistically independent of most other systemic or ocular parameters. A pterygium was not a biomarker for an internal medical disease.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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