July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Higher ROP incidence in extremely preterm infants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christina Gerth-Kahlert
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Aylin Taner
    Dept of Ophthalmology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Senait Tekle
    Department of Biostatistics, Institute for Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Prevention, Switzerland
  • Torsten Hothorn
    Department of Biostatistics, Institute for Epidemiology, Biostatistics, and Prevention, Switzerland
  • Mark Adams
    Department of Neonatology, University Hospital and University of Zurich, Switzerland
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Christina Gerth-Kahlert, None; Aylin Taner, None; Senait Tekle, None; Torsten Hothorn, None; Mark Adams, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  none
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6525. doi:
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      Christina Gerth-Kahlert, Aylin Taner, Senait Tekle, Torsten Hothorn, Mark Adams; Higher ROP incidence in extremely preterm infants . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6525.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : In Switzerland, the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) stages 1 to 5 and of ROP requiring treatment is very low with 9.3 % and 1.2%, respectively. An increase in ROP treatment at our institution was observed after mid-2015. Our aim was to analyze possible reasons associated to this change to inform further management.

Methods : Retrospective analysis of all preterm infants born 7/2013 to 6/2017 with a gestational age (GA) < 29 completed weeks admitted to the local neonatal intensive care unit during the first 28 days of life. Data collection was based on the definition used for the Swiss Neonatal Network and consisted of 29 variables. Primary outcome was ROP treatment and secondary outcome was severest ROP stage (ROPmax). The remaining 27 variables were explanatory. Statistical analysis was performed using generalized additive models (GAM) in R.

Results : Significant predictors for ROPmax were GA, days of mechanical ventilation, and multiple births. A composite of severe comorbidities had no significant effect on ROPmax>0. Applying the GAM, GA was identified as the only significant risk factor for ROPmax (p-value < 0.01). This is in accordance with the decreased probability of death over time for infants born with a GA < 29 weeks during the study period.

Conclusions : Improved care and increased survival rate of extremely preterm infants resulted in an increased risk for ROP at our institution. Despite the increase, the incidence is still very low compared to other countries. No other additive factors were identified.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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