July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
The effect of Manuka eye drops on tear film properties
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jacqueline Tan
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Tianni Jia
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Roslyn Liao
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Fiona Stapleton
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jacqueline Tan, None; Tianni Jia, None; Roslyn Liao, None; Fiona Stapleton, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 6739. doi:
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      Jacqueline Tan, Tianni Jia, Roslyn Liao, Fiona Stapleton; The effect of Manuka eye drops on tear film properties. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):6739.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To evaluate the effects of Manuka (Leptospermum sp. honey) eye drops versus a conventional non-lipid based eye drop on tear film properties in symptomatic dry eye subjects after 28 days of treatment.

Methods : Forty-six subjects with symptoms of dry eye (Ocular Surface Disease Index [OSDI] score >12) were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive either the test Manuka (Melcare Biomedical, Australia) or control non-lipid based lubricant (Alcon, USA) eye drops in this double-masked study (NCT03622619). Lipid layer thickness (LLT; Lipiview II, TearScience), tear film evaporation rate (TER; Vapometer, Delfin Technologies), fluorescein tear film break-up time (TBUT) and subjective symptoms scores (OSDI) and visual analogue scales (VAS) for burning/stinging, grittiness/foreign body sensation, dryness, blurry vision and overall discomfort were measured before and after 28 days of instilling the eye drops three times daily. Independent t-tests or Mann Whitney U tests were used to compare the two groups.

Results : Forty-two subjects completed the study: 21 subjects (9 males and 12 females) with average age 22.2 ± 3.5 years in the test group, and 21 subjects (5 males and 16 females) with average age 20.6 ± 3.2 years in the control group. After 28 days of treatment, TER showed a significantly greater reduction in the test group compared to the control group (-10.8 ± 16.8 vs. 0.7 ± 10.8 gm-2h, p = 0.01). TBUT tended to increase in the test group compared to the control group (2.0 ± 3.0 vs. 0.0 ± 3.1 sec, p = 0.06), and a significantly greater reduction (improvement) in OSDI scores was observed in the test group compared to the control group (-19.6 ± 10.9 vs. -10.7 ± 7.1, p = 0.01). No significant differences were found between the two groups for LLT and any of the VAS scores.

Conclusions : The Manuka eye drops were more effective for reducing TER, increasing TBUT and improving symptoms of dry eye compared to the conventional non-lipid based eye drops after 28 days of daily use.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

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