July 2019
Volume 60, Issue 9
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   July 2019
Age-dependence of mouse lens viscoelasticity
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bianca Maceo Heilman
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Kelly Mote
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Alex Gonzalez
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Cornelis Rowaan
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Esdras Arrieta
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Juan Silgado
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Ernesto Weisson
    Dr. Nasser Ibrahim Al Rashid Orbital Vision Research Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Wyndham More Batchelor
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Noel Marysa Ziebarth
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Marco Ruggeri
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Sara Cabrera-Ghayouri
    Allergan, Irvine, California, United States
  • Mohammed Dibas
    Allergan, Irvine, California, United States
  • Jean-Marie Parel
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Vision Cooperative Research Centre, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Fabrice Manns
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Miami College of Engineering, Coral Gables, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Bianca Maceo Heilman, None; Kelly Mote, None; Alex Gonzalez, None; Cornelis Rowaan, None; Esdras Arrieta, None; Juan Silgado, None; Ernesto Weisson, None; Wyndham Batchelor, None; Noel Ziebarth, None; Marco Ruggeri, None; Sara Cabrera-Ghayouri, Allergan (E); Mohammed Dibas, Allergan (E); Jean-Marie Parel, None; Fabrice Manns, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Allergan; NEI Grants: P30EY14801 (Center Grant); Florida Lions Eye Bank and Beauty of Sight Foundation; Research to Prevent Blindness; Drs. KR Olsen and ME Hildebrandt, Drs. Raksha Urs and Aaron Furtado, the Henri and Flore Lesieur Foundation (JMP).
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science July 2019, Vol.60, 3165. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Bianca Maceo Heilman, Kelly Mote, Alex Gonzalez, Cornelis Rowaan, Esdras Arrieta, Juan Silgado, Ernesto Weisson, Wyndham More Batchelor, Noel Marysa Ziebarth, Marco Ruggeri, Sara Cabrera-Ghayouri, Mohammed Dibas, Jean-Marie Parel, Fabrice Manns; Age-dependence of mouse lens viscoelasticity. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2019;60(9):3165.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Prior studies using compression testing suggest the mouse lens becomes stiffer with age, but the age-dependence of mouse lens viscosity has not been characterized. The purpose of this study was to measure and compare the viscoelasticity of young and old mice by quantifying their response during compression and stress relaxation.

Methods : Data were acquired on 10 young (8 weeks old) and 10 old (8 months old) C57BL/6J mouse lenses. Lenses were extracted from the eye and incubated (Garner & Garner. IOVS 2016;57:2851-2863) in a solution of Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) and 1% antimycotic at 37°C for 18 hours. Following the incubation, the lenses were placed in a DMEM-filled chamber within a custom-built elastometer system (Figure 1). The elastometer compresses the lens using a 4mm diameter cylindrical probe connected to a load sensor mounted on a computer-controlled positioning stage. The elastometer includes an imaging system that continuously records bottom and side views of the lens during experiments. The lens was compressed by 600µm at a speed of 48.6µm/s and the probe was held at the final position for 5 minutes. The load was recorded during the compression and stress relaxation phases. The experiment was performed a total of 3 times on each lens, with a resting period of 6 minutes between compressions. All lenses were imaged pre- and post-compression using SD-OCT to ensure the capsule remained intact (Figure 2). Lens stiffness in g/mm was estimated from linear fits of load-displacement data recorded during the first 250s of the compression phase. The relaxation phase was fit with a three-term exponential series. The time constants (t1, t2, t3) and asymptotic load (F) were quantified from the fit. The stiffness, time constants and asymptotic load of young and old mouse lenses were compared.

Results : The stiffness of the young and old lenses were 1.16±0.11g/mm and 1.35±0.14g/mm, respectively. The three time constants were t1 = 223.2±5.7s, t2 = 25.0±1.3s, t3= 3.2±0.6s for the young lenses and t1 = 192.2±5.4s, t2 = 22.2±0.8s and t3 = 2.5±0.1s for the old lenses. The asymptotic loads for the young and old lenses were 1166.6±22.5mg and 1180.0±15.5mg, respectively. The linear fit (stiffness) and time constants were statistically different (p<0.05) between the young and old mouse lenses.

Conclusions : Old mouse lenses are stiffer and less viscous (faster stress relaxation time) than young mouse lenses.

This abstract was presented at the 2019 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Vancouver, Canada, April 28 - May 2, 2019.

 

 

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